Earth Was a Moon of Saturn

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Conjecture: Who Sent Saturn?

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:50 pm

But as we all know Venus regularly transits the sun. At intervalls of 8 years, 121.5 years, 8 years, and 105.5 years, it passes between the sun and earth, so that its plasmasphere/tail brushes the earth's magnetosphere.


Since the orbits are tilted, the planets seldom are in a direct line with the Sun. Additionally, although the plasmasphere tail Venus is very long, it does not quite extend to Earth. However, it is possible for the Moon to fall into place in such a conjunction, and provide a remaining path to the circuit.

I could be wrong but I believe the Moon is the only satellite of any planet to enter/exit its host planets plasmasphere. Which opens a whole can of worms :)

There would be an incubation period (3 months). SARS had such a conjunction 3 months previous to the first outbreak. So did The Great Influenza ... cases were reported on either side of the Atlantic nearly simultaneously for the latter.
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Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:39 pm

According to Wal Thornhill Saturn was initially a brown dvarf star that entered our solar system.
From where did it came ? Where was it created ?
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby Younger Dryas » Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:49 pm

Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.
"I decided to believe, as you might decide to take
an aspirin: It can't hurt, and you might get better."
-- Umberto Eco Foucault's Pendulum (1988)
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:24 am

Younger Dryas wrote:Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.

Like the "lost son" in the Bible ;)

But it would be interesting to know how the origin of Saturn is explaned by the EU.
Did it come from an other solar system ?
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:13 am

rickard wrote:
Younger Dryas wrote:Sentimentally,

I'd like to think he sent himself - to learn, and then after a long time away - got to come home.

Like the "lost son" in the Bible ;)

But it would be interesting to know how the origin of Saturn is explaned by the EU.
Did it come from an other solar system ?


Hi Rickard,

Accourding to EU:
Saturn was a star first with its own satellites (together with the Earth), Saturn was our primeval star (Kronos). The complete saturn system was adopted by Sol (our current sun), a younger hotter star than Saturn.

Saturn was probably a red star/brown dwarf before being captured by Sol.
---

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby nick c » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:38 am

Hi rickard,
According to Wal Thornhill Saturn was initially a brown dvarf star that entered our solar system.
From where did it came ?
I can't speak for Wal, but according to my understanding Saturn was captured by the Sun. So the answer to your question is interstellar space.
Keep in mind, that presently of the 10 closest stellar systems to our Sun there are 15 known stars and 11 of those are brown or red dwarfs (and none of these dwarfs are visible to the naked eye.)
see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_n ... own_dwarfs

From this it is a safe assumption that brown and red dwarfs are the most common stellar types in the galaxy. Also, one can safely assume that there is a continuum of celestial objects where some are "in between" or intermediate objects. Hence the often used description of the present day Jupiter and Saturn as failed or dark stars.

In the EU paradigm the position of a star on the Hertsprung-Russell diagram describes its electrical state and that is subject to change as the ambient electrical environment changes. This is in contrast to the mainstream's interpretation that the H-R diagram depicts slow stellar evolution.


Where was it created ?
Consistent with the Electric Star model we can assume that the hypothesized proto Saturn was created in one of two ways.
1. In a molecular gas (plasma) cloud through a z pinch of a galactic birkeland current
2. or, it fissioned from a larger stellar object, which went nova while under electrical stress (from a galactic birkeland current)

As a note, Cardona proposed that the proto Saturn brown dwarf was transported to the Milky Way through a merger with the Sagitarrius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy.
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Re: Saturn

Unread postby rickard » Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:30 am

Hi Nick,

Thank you for the interesting information.

There are also many wandering planets out there ...
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ut-a-home/

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