Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

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Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby querious » Thu May 25, 2017 8:30 pm

Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby Lloyd » Tue May 30, 2017 7:09 am

I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed May 31, 2017 8:15 am

querious wrote:Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."


I think they are jumping the gun with this, electrons go both ways, there is a Birkeland current here, counter rotation and in and out flows of charged particles, the probe probably just went over a region where more electrons came out then in, they should be able to pick up variations...... :?

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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:21 am

Lloyd wrote:I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.


Hi Lloyd,

The blue color at the poles is interesting*, i tried to find what EU can say about this, but did not find anything.

*https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2017-05/Juno2.jpg

I think because of the Birkeland current action, the material that are more on the inside of Jupiter can more easily be seen at the poles because they would uplift more... just an idea. Could the core consolidate into a rock body, yes, sure why not, it would take a long time i think.

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