Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

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Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby querious » Thu May 25, 2017 8:30 pm

Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby Lloyd » Tue May 30, 2017 7:09 am

I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.
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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Wed May 31, 2017 8:15 am

querious wrote:Ok, this is weird...

From NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter
-The gas giant is getting really weird.

...Connerney and his colleagues thought Jupiter's light-show was due to a similar downward flow of electrons pouring into the Jovian atmosphere.

But Juno's instruments revealed a whole other story. The Jovian aurorae are powered by the electrons being sucked out of the planet's polar region, which basically means that Jupiter powers its light-show all on its own.

"It's a 180-degree reversal of what we were originally assuming," Connerney told ScienceAlert. "We never expected to see such strong auroral emissions caused by electrons being channelled out of the polar region."


I think they are jumping the gun with this, electrons go both ways, there is a Birkeland current here, counter rotation and in and out flows of charged particles, the probe probably just went over a region where more electrons came out then in, they should be able to pick up variations...... :?

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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby D_Archer » Tue Jun 06, 2017 2:21 am

Lloyd wrote:I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.


Hi Lloyd,

The blue color at the poles is interesting*, i tried to find what EU can say about this, but did not find anything.

*https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2017-05/Juno2.jpg

I think because of the Birkeland current action, the material that are more on the inside of Jupiter can more easily be seen at the poles because they would uplift more... just an idea. Could the core consolidate into a rock body, yes, sure why not, it would take a long time i think.

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Re: Juno Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter

Unread postby kodybatill » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:42 pm

D_Archer wrote:
Lloyd wrote:I've been wanting to know since a few years ago how large are the solid parts of the gas giants. They seem to be saying now that the gravity measurements suggest that Jupiter doesn't have a very solid core, but that it's slushy or indistinct and from 7 to 25 Earth masses. That seems kind of small. If Jupiter lost all its gaseous atmosphere, the remaining core would probably be not over 24,000 miles in diameter. I guess that's not so small, about the size of the smaller gas giants. I wonder if the slushy core would consolidate into a rocky body.


Hi Lloyd,

The blue color at the poles is interesting*, i tried to find what EU can say about this, but did not find anything.

*https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2017-05/Juno2.jpg

I think because of the Birkeland current action, the material that are more on the inside of Jupiter can more easily be seen at the poles because they would uplift more... just an idea. Could the core consolidate into a rock body, yes, sure why not, it would take a long time i think.

Regards,
Daniel


I believe the white blue color to be Magnesium type elements and the black blue to be Calcium type elements. For these to be on the north and south poles - means that a lot of inert gases, seeming to mostly be the white-yellow of Niton/Neon type - are moving so close to Magnesium - that the positrons or colors around opposites being taken by the Niton type inert gases - are slowing down to have a noticeable wall between the calcium which is leaving behind all positrons or colors around opposites - and the rest of the yellow-white Niton type gases of taking positrons or colors around opposites of it's surface. The connection between positrons/colors around opposites, and protons, is magnetism.
Then the bands of white/orange would be fluorine type elements of moving heat when ever only some positrons are left behind - and the black orange would be chlorine type elements of slowing down orbits so that infra-red connections can be made for a longer amount of time.
This would mean that Jupiter's purpose is along the lines of - creating heat, from the slowing down of Niton, which pushes pressure on water, of a type that separates calcium from magnesium - and so also similar positrons separated from similar positrons.

I would say that Jupiter contains at it's center a lot of hydrogen at 90 degrees to either first generation silicon type elements, or first generation electron neutrinos. This design itself brings out the brightness of positrons or colors around opposites - which seems like would be guided by the similar blue positrons or colors around opposites of calcium and magnesium, by being split at any range of moments of 90 degrees being formed between their own positrons - hence leading to direct resonant communication between the surface and possible 90 degree electron neutrino-silicon/hydrogen center.
Jupiter creates interstellar magnesium type neutrons which as well as becoming brighter than most magnesium because of the silicon-hydrogen center - also pushes against Niton which creates the well known (to atomic physicists) - effect of a Universal pressure on all water - which now with brighter colors - create neutrons that across a very wide spectra - push against water, possibly more than a more massive star, if it was not created in the same way - mainly to say, Jupiter is pushing against water more than a larger star that is lower in Niton water pressure elements.

What does this means for EU?
Probably that when electric forces slow down, they merge with water.
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