Fluctuations in the length of day.

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby JouniJokela » Wed Jan 04, 2017 11:01 am

Inspired by the lates "TPOD", I post this issue here to be talked. As this is not directly the topic provided in TPOD, I open a new here where it belongs.

The rotational kinetic energy of Earth changes more than can be explained by the Earths internal aspects. This is another prove about how everything is connected to the sun. I've worked a full scale post here;
http://physics.stackexchange.com/questi ... rgy-change
So I dont repeat it. pls. look also my own answer to the question, this;
http://physics.stackexchange.com/questi ... 763#214763
And maybe even this Mercury stuff, which i admit, is not quite up to date.
http://physics.stackexchange.com/questi ... modynamics

Wikipedia provides also very good background info;
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_length_fluctuations
Last edited by nick c on Tue Jan 24, 2017 6:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: spelling correction to thread title
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Re: Fluctuations in the lenght of day.

Unread postby webolife » Sat Jan 07, 2017 9:09 pm

Very interesting post and articles.
It is not difficult to envision and attribute the micro-second fluctuations of LOD to internal interactions within the core[s], mantle and crust, and the tidal effect on atmosphere/surface friction due to gravitation wrt the moon and sun. Also the annual and semiannual "tweeks" in these fluctuations are recognizable effects of the earth's elliptical orbit, ie. the earth's changing angular momentum as it revolves around the sun translates, or rather transforms somewhat [due to conservation of AM] to a rotational fluctuation "tweek"... I would think that winter days then, due to the earth's nearness to perihelion and higher orbital velocity, would lose some rotational AM...ie. the days could be slightly longer. The summer days would thus be slightly shorter, approaching aphelion. Of course, the sun's angular relative displacement variance, as seen from the earth, ie. it's changing position in the ecliptic, is very noticeable to an astronomer, but these minor rotational fluctuations will go unnoticed by pretty much everyone (except maybe you and me!!! :lol: )
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Re: Fluctuations in the lenght of day.

Unread postby JouniJokela » Sun Jan 08, 2017 5:46 am

webolife wrote:I would think that winter days then, due to the earth's nearness to perihelion and higher orbital velocity, would lose some rotational AM...ie. the days could be slightly longer. The summer days would thus be slightly shorter, approaching aphelion.


Interesting aspect. This actually seems to have a causality too. You obviously noted that the diagram was;
Note that this is not calendar Year, it starts on Equinox; 20/21 March.

And the similar Rotation can be seen in Mercury.

Anyhow, the yearly fluctuations are one thing, but the point above this is;
Another example can be made through long term changes. The slowest rotation speed ever was measured 18.3.1973; 86400.0041340 seconds, the fastest so far was measured at 5.7.2005; 86399.9989263 seconds. This difference means that 25.6 x10^21 J of Kinetic energy was stored for 32 years.


And I can't see anything in our solar system which could have been responsible for such a long cycle and scale.
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Re: Fluctuations in the lenght of day.

Unread postby webolife » Sun Jan 08, 2017 9:41 pm

Kinetic energy "stored" sounds like an oxymoron to me.
I wonder if there is a different way to describe this differential?
Or is there a 64-year cycle that is affecting the Earth's AM budget?? A "true" Jupiter effect perhaps, involving the orbital synchronicities of Jove and Saturn, or electromagnetic field fluxes?
Or is the 32 year flux purely a random variance in a generally and virtually stable momentum equilibrium/conservation fundament...
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Re: Fluctuations in the lenght of day.

Unread postby JouniJokela » Fri Jan 20, 2017 11:26 am

webolife wrote:Kinetic energy "stored" sounds like an oxymoron to me.
I wonder if there is a different way to describe this differential?


It was a purposely phrased Oxymoron, to show that "This cant be".
I mean, if you don't notice any problem in the current model, with Gravity and all, then the model must be correct.

So if "This cant be", then it's another notion in the direction, that the Gravity, as we expect it to be, with all that "Dark Matter" -nonsense etc, must be WRONG.

If your theory doesn't fit with the observation, ITS WRONG.
Thus, If you observe an increase in rotational Kinetic energy, there must be an energy input, as -indeed- it can't be stored in these scales.
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Re: Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby nick c » Tue Jan 24, 2017 7:14 pm

ON THE CONVECTION OF ELECTRIC CHARGE BY THE ROTATING EARTH
by Ralph Juergens
http://saturniancosmology.org/files/jue ... 2convc.txt

Electric Convection and the Earth's Rotational Glitches

In 1960 Danjon reported a sudden deceleration of the Earth's rotation
following a solar flare of record intensity.(8) According to his
observations, the length of the day increased by 0.85 millisecond and
thereafter began to decrease at a rate of 3.7 microseconds per day.
Eventually the rate of spin stabilized near its pre-flare value.

This announcement raised quite a few eyebrows. Quite impossible, said
the experts. One skeptic pointed out that the phenomenon implied an
increase in the Earth's polar moment of inertia of such magnitude as
might only be produced, for example, by instantly lifting the entire
Himalayan massif to a considerable height. Danjon, anticipating such
objections, argued that "it is very likely electromagnetism alone that
will furnish the explanation for these variations . . ." But his claim
was generally disregarded.

Then in 1972 it happened again, even more impressively. Danjon was
gone (deceased 1967), but Plagemann and Gribbin were on the watch.
They found that on August 7-8, following a week of frenzied solar
activity, the length of the day suddenly increased by more than 10
milliseconds. And again there was a gradual return to normal.(9)

Borrowing a term from pulsar astrophysicists, Plagemann and Gribbin
called the sudden deceleration of the Earth a "glitch."
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Re: Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby willendure » Thu Jan 26, 2017 3:27 am

nick c wrote:ON THE CONVECTION OF ELECTRIC CHARGE BY THE ROTATING EARTH
by Ralph Juergens
http://saturniancosmology.org/files/jue ... 2convc.txt

Electric Convection and the Earth's Rotational Glitches

In 1960 Danjon reported a sudden deceleration of the Earth's rotation
following a solar flare of record intensity.(8) According to his
observations, the length of the day increased by 0.85 millisecond and
thereafter began to decrease at a rate of 3.7 microseconds per day.
Eventually the rate of spin stabilized near its pre-flare value.

This announcement raised quite a few eyebrows. Quite impossible, said
the experts. One skeptic pointed out that the phenomenon implied an
increase in the Earth's polar moment of inertia of such magnitude as
might only be produced, for example, by instantly lifting the entire
Himalayan massif to a considerable height. Danjon, anticipating such
objections, argued that "it is very likely electromagnetism alone that
will furnish the explanation for these variations . . ." But his claim
was generally disregarded.

Then in 1972 it happened again, even more impressively. Danjon was
gone (deceased 1967), but Plagemann and Gribbin were on the watch.
They found that on August 7-8, following a week of frenzied solar
activity, the length of the day suddenly increased by more than 10
milliseconds. And again there was a gradual return to normal.(9)

Borrowing a term from pulsar astrophysicists, Plagemann and Gribbin
called the sudden deceleration of the Earth a "glitch."


Never heard of this until now. How fascinating. :-)
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Re: Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby willendure » Thu Jan 26, 2017 4:22 am

ON THE CONVECTION OF ELECTRIC CHARGE BY THE ROTATING EARTH

...

Booker, in a straightforward work on the fundamentals of electrical
science, stresses the fact that electric charge placed on a rotating
flywheel increases its polar moment of inertia.(6) The presumption, of
course, is that the charge is convected as the flywheel rotates and
thus constitutes an electric current.


Has anyone a diagram showing what convected charge in a spinning flywheel looks like? I mean why does it 'convect' and what path does the current flow along?
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Re: Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Jan 26, 2017 9:34 am

image:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Model_of_the_global_magnetospheric_electric_convection_field.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetosp ... tion_field


The inertial effect of the quantity LQ^2 -- an apparent increase in
mass for the flywheel rim -- is due to electromagnetic induction as
the charge rotates with the rim, creating an electric current.

Suppose we adapt this to the problem of terrestrial rotation by
assuming that any suddenly emplaced (excess) electric charge becomes
distributed over the entire globe
in a time that is negligibly short.
-Juergens


convection = distribution ?
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Re: Fluctuations in the length of day.

Unread postby seasmith » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:34 am

Will,
Juergens original article, with illustrations, is available here (Ian Tresman):

https://www.catastrophism.com/cdrom/pub ... /index.htm
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