Exo Planets and Solar Systems

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Re: Newfound Planet Orbits Backward - Let's give EU a try at it!

Unread postby Dotini » Sat Apr 17, 2010 4:26 pm

Thanks for that info, nick c. I like it, but I have a hard time understanding how capture really works. It seems to me that celestial close encounters would almost always result in escape or not-so-eventual collision. I imagine some very stringent conditions must be met before a stable orbital capture could occur, up to and including the involvement of a 3rd body. I would appreciate a careful explanation of orbital capture, if available.

Respectfully,
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Re: Newfound Planet Orbits Backward - Let's give EU a try at it!

Unread postby nick c » Sat Apr 17, 2010 8:37 pm

hi Dotini,
It seems to me that celestial close encounters would almost always result in escape or not-so-eventual collision. I imagine some very stringent conditions must be met before a stable orbital capture could occur, up to and including the involvement of a 3rd body. I would appreciate a careful explanation of orbital capture, if available.
You are looking at the problem with a gravity only bias.
But hang on, you say. What about the fact that gravitational capture is highly unlikely? That’s true. But this is an Electric Universe. Each star, being an electrical body in a galactic discharge, will have a plasma sheath that limits the weak electric field between the star and the sheath. It is the Sun’s heliosphere. The plasma sheath is a “double layer” where almost the entire voltage drop between the star and the galaxy will be found. The heliosphere is about 200 AU across. That’s a big target! You could fit about 1,300 such targets between the nearest star and us. The size of this electrical target is important because it is the minimum distance at which the electrical “insulation” between two stars breaks down. I say “minimum” because the polar circuit of each star extends much, much further—as we see where the circuit has been “lit up” in a planetary nebulae.
http://www.holoscience.com/news.php?article=7y7d3dn5


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Warm Saturns and their Moons

Unread postby tholden » Wed May 12, 2010 4:01 am

http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=12447

Recent work from the Lick-Carnegie team has found that the M-dwarf HIP 57050 is orbited by a Saturn-mass world with an orbital period of 41.4 days. What catches the eye about this exoplanet is its temperature, some 230 kelvin or -43 degrees Celsius, warm enough to place it in the habitable zone of the star. Based on our knowledge of the gas giants in our own Solar System, it’s a natural supposition that this is a world with moons, and if so, their location in the habitable zone draws inevitable comparisons with fictional worlds like Pandora....
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Planet Devoured by its Star

Unread postby VeldesX » Mon May 24, 2010 11:00 am

Not an electric universe topic exactly, but some of the experts may find an electrical connection to my question:

All over the news sites are stories of Planet WASP-12b, a rather large planet being devoured by the star it is closely orbiting. One of the statements by an astromer is, "We have identified chemical elements never before seen on planets outside our own Solar System."

Does he mean something other than hydrogen and iron, or perhaps something more exotic than nature ordinarily allows, such as the theoretical "stable belt" of elements that could exists with atomic numbers above 190?

Furthermore, what are the electrical implications of a gaseous planet having an extensive atmosphere being stripped by its star?
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Re: Planet Devoured by its Star

Unread postby nick c » Mon May 24, 2010 2:19 pm

hi VeldesX,

As far as I know, the planet WASP 12b is still in orbit around the primary star. Whether it will be consumed by the primary remains to be seen.
This may not be a case of the death of a planet, but rather the birth.

This type of planet is called a 'hot Jupiter.' There are many examples known:
http://www.superwasp.org/wasp_planets.htm

A related thread:
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=2213&p=34691

Do you have a link for the item concerning the elements detected?

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Re: Planet Devoured by its Star

Unread postby solrey » Mon May 24, 2010 11:01 pm

Here's a link to the paper:

http://hubblesite.org/pubinfo/pdf/2010/15/pdf.pdf

At least one article I read mentioned something about the star and planet sharing or passing elements back and forth. That would seem to fit the unipolar inductor model, such as described in this paper on the electromagnetic plasma connection between Io and Jupiter. The close proximity of the planet to the parent star and it's eccentric orbit suggests this is a recent expulsion/fissioning event. Until these close orbiting gas giants were discovered, mainstream theory not only failed to predict them, it said they couldn't exist. Can't find a link right now but I've seen that from more than one source. Electric Universe, otoh, expects an abundance of gas giants in close orbit to their parent stars, as well as binary star systems.

Planet Birthing
Planet Birthing - more evidence

So Wasp12b is likely a newly created planet. By contrast, this system might include a planet that was recently captured.

http://www.universetoday.com/2010/05/24 ... more-65001

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Re: Planet Devoured by its Star

Unread postby ETSubmariner » Tue May 25, 2010 6:39 pm

That's what I was thinking solrey, a recent birth.
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planet creation or planet assimilation

Unread postby beekeeper » Wed May 26, 2010 9:58 am

Seen this news report on tv regarding a planet being devoured by a star all this being taken in by the hubble telescope through a new feature added recently. following is the address of the article with a picture. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7761596/ From another perspective it could look like a planet is being ejected from the star. :mrgreen:

Moderator note:
This post and the next are merged into this thread from the "planet creation or planet assimilation" thread.
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Re: planet creation or planet assimilation

Unread postby beekeeper » Wed May 26, 2010 10:00 am

guess I should have read the recent postings it is already on one of them interesting thought
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Re: Planet Devoured by its Star

Unread postby Komorikid » Thu May 27, 2010 6:01 pm

From another perspective it could look like a planet is being ejected from the star.


My thoughts exactly BK, considering this is an artist's impression based on standard orthodoxy. This could just as easily be depicted as Saturnian ejection complete with its ring of debris.

Your link is dead so I got this one from the Hubble site.

Image

What is also very interesting is the description of the exoplanet as "FOOTBALL" shaped.
The cosmic egg shape perhaps.
Fiction can't be proven. Fact can't be denied - Paul M
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highly inclined orbits of planets

Unread postby viscount aero » Sun May 30, 2010 11:38 pm

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Out_O ... m_999.html

excerpt:
"'Out Of Whack' Planetary System
by Staff Writers

Houston TX (SPX) May 28, 2010
The discovery of a planetary system "out of whack," where the orbits of two planets are at a steep angle to each other, was reported by a team of astronomers led by Barbara McArthur of The University of Texas at Austin McDonald Observatory.

This surprising finding will affect theories of how multi-planet systems evolve and shows that some violent events can happen to disrupt planets' orbits after a planetary system forms, say researchers.

"The findings mean that future studies of exoplanetary systems will be more complicated. Astronomers can no longer assume all planets orbit their parent star in a single plane," McArthur says.

McArthur and her team used data from Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the giant Hobby-Eberly Telescope, and other ground-based telescopes combined with extensive modeling to unearth a landslide of information about the planetary system surrounding the nearby star Upsilon Andromedae.

McArthur reported these findings in a press conference at the 216th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Miami, along with her collaborator Fritz Benedict, also of McDonald Observatory, and team member Rory Barnes of the University of Washington. The work also will be published in the June 1 edition of the Astrophysical Journal."
---------------------------------

As the article reads further the astronomers admit to being confounded, then resort to the typical trite gravitational explanations. However they entertain the idea of migrating planets. In a way they have to. Moreover, the existence of the unusual solar system in question clearly flies in the face of the flawed core-accretion theory. And where there is one of these there are surely thousands more.
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Mystery object orbiting distant star baffles astronomers

Unread postby Maddogkull1 » Mon Jul 05, 2010 5:21 pm

http://io9.com/5578460/mystery-object-o ... stronomers

500 light years away, nestled in the constellation Scorpius, scientists have found an object that shouldn't exist. Eight times larger than Jupiter, the object is in distant orbit around a very young star. And it breaks the laws of physics.


Amazing, Open for disscussion.
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Re: Mystery object orbiting distant star baffles astronomers

Unread postby CTJG 1986 » Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:09 pm

I remember the days when I thought discoveries like this were amazing, now I find them annoying.

They are annoying because they get one's hopes up in regards to thinking that maybe, finally the mainstream will get the hint, but in the end they always figure out a way to continue on as usual. Chances are they will figure out a way to determine that it is caused by dark matter or dark energy, or maybe a combination of both.

Maybe they'll go all out and invent some new invisible things to explain it, but I don't see this leading to any serious challenge of conventional views.

The actual discovery is exciting to me in the sense that it helps verify my personal views, but with the views I hold it's not an unexpected discovery so it's not 'amazing' per say.

I do like the end of that article you posted though, they offer as good an explanation as the mainstream community does for most things... ;)

Edit: I'm not providing my personal views at the moment as although they are based out of EU theory they are not what would be considered "accepted" EU theory.

I think it would be better to get a true EU perspective on it before I start cluttering things up with my wild speculations which would be better suited for the NIaMI section.
The difference between a Creationist and a believer in the Big Bang is that the Creationists admit they are operating on blind faith... Big Bang believers call their blind faith "theoretical mathematical variables" and claim to be scientists rather than the theologists they really are.
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Re: Mystery object orbiting distant star baffles astronomers

Unread postby Lloyd » Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:20 am

* The planet orbits the star at 300 AU, according to California Institute of Technology astronomer John Johnson, who told Discovery News:
Current theories, observations and computer models show that planets form from a disk of gas and dust that circles young stars. Less material is available as the distance to the parent star grows. You actually have to have material out there to have the planet forming.

* The Kuiper belt is 30 to 50 AU from the sun, though some scientists think it extends to 100 AU. The planet discussed above would be 6 times farther from the star than any known Kuiper belt object is from the sun. And all Kuiper belt objects are small, about the size of Pluto or a large moon. Whereas this planet is 8 times as massive as Jupiter.
* The article says:
Another option is that the object is a new type of failed star — something akin to a brown dwarf, though about half the size — which formed along with the primary star about 5 million years ago. But scientists similarly are at a loss to explain how such a relatively small object could have survived the stellar birthing process.

* I wonder what there is about the "object" that makes them think it's a failed star. Does it emit light, rather than reflect light? According to this http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... 0524_b.jpg it does emit infrared light.
* Undoubtedly, they assume that stars are formed by the nebular theory process. I suppose they would guess that the planet came to its present orbit after a near collision with a large object, such as the star it orbits. They know a little about "runaway" stars, so they might guess that such a star caused the planet to come to its unusual [?] orbit. Here's a search link on runaway stars.
http://www.google.com/#hl=en&source=hp& ... be010d257f
* Here are 2 posts I made last year that discuss electrical star and planet formation in some detail.
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpB ... f44#p18358
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpB ... f44#p18398
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NASA Finds Super-Hot Planet with Unique Comet-Like Tail

Unread postby M3RK » Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:34 pm

Saw this today...made me laugh a little: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/planet-tail.html

It almost sounds plausible until you get to the bit about the speed of the ejected atmosphere:
The COS data also showed the material leaving the planet was not all traveling at the same speed. "We found gas escaping at high velocities, with a large amount of this gas flowing toward us at 22,000 miles per hour," Linsky said. "This large gas flow is likely gas swept up by the stellar wind to form the comet-like tail trailing the planet."


Shoot, they even call it a comet-like-tail...you'd think they'd figure that since very little is known about comets and their tails then the same theories for a planet would be defunk...but I guess not.

Maybe they will actually image this thing at some point instead of making pretty paintings and maybe that would make things abit more understandable.

Any thoughts out there?
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