Electric Meteors and Meteorites

Historic planetary instability and catastrophe. Evidence for electrical scarring on planets and moons. Electrical events in today's solar system. Electric Earth.

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Diamonds found in meteorite in California

Unread postby viscount aero » Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:29 pm

Diamonds found in meteorite that fell in Sierra Gold Country

from:
http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/D ... 884457.php

Fragments of the Sutter’s Mill meteorite were collected by NASA Ames and SETI Institute astronomer Peter Jenniskens on April 24, 2012, two days after the fall. This was the second recovered find.

Researchers have discovered small diamonds in the fragments of a meteorite that fell in the Sierra’s Gold Country, offering a glimpse into the prehistory of our solar system, NASA officials said Friday.

In a bizarre twist, some of largest chunks of the meteorite were found in April 2012 after it broke up near Sutter’s Mill, where gold was first found in California in 1848. The meteor has come to bare the name of the gold discovery site.
Before taking to the hills in search of untold riches, modern-day Forty-Niners will want to take note of the size of the diamonds found in the Sutter’s Mill meteorite: They’re really just grains likely invisible to the naked eye.
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"the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite"

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:33 am

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6213/1100

Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite

Meteorites exposed to high pressures and temperatures during impact-induced shock often contain minerals whose occurrence and stability normally confine them to the deeper portions of Earth’s mantle. One exception has been MgSiO3 in the perovskite structure, which is the most abundant solid phase in Earth. Here we report the discovery of this important phase as a mineral in the Tenham L6 chondrite and approved by the International Mineralogical Association (specimen IMA 2014-017). MgSiO3-perovskite is now called bridgmanite. The associated phase assemblage constrains peak shock conditions to ~ 24 gigapascals and 2300 kelvin. The discovery concludes a half century of efforts to find, identify, and characterize a natural specimen of this important mineral.


I could not find the full copy yet, nor a simular article. Anyone?
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: "the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteor

Unread postby Dotini » Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:41 am

MrAmsterdam wrote:
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6213/1100

Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite

Meteorites exposed to high pressures and temperatures during impact-induced shock often contain minerals whose occurrence and stability normally confine them to the deeper portions of Earth’s mantle. One exception has been MgSiO3 in the perovskite structure, which is the most abundant solid phase in Earth. Here we report the discovery of this important phase as a mineral in the Tenham L6 chondrite and approved by the International Mineralogical Association (specimen IMA 2014-017). MgSiO3-perovskite is now called bridgmanite. The associated phase assemblage constrains peak shock conditions to ~ 24 gigapascals and 2300 kelvin. The discovery concludes a half century of efforts to find, identify, and characterize a natural specimen of this important mineral.


I could not find the full copy yet, nor a simular article. Anyone?

http://www.livescience.com/46337-elusiv ... anite.html
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Re: "the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteor

Unread postby seasmith » Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:19 pm

Dotini wrote:

MrAmsterdam wrote:
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6213/1100

Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite

Meteorites exposed to high pressures and temperatures during impact-induced shock often contain minerals whose occurrence and stability normally confine them to the deeper portions of Earth’s mantle. One exception has been MgSiO3 in the perovskite structure, which is the most abundant solid phase in Earth. Here we report the discovery of this important phase as a mineral in the Tenham L6 chondrite and approved by the International Mineralogical Association (specimen IMA 2014-017). MgSiO3-perovskite is now called bridgmanite. The associated phase assemblage constrains peak shock conditions to ~ 24 gigapascals and 2300 kelvin. The discovery concludes a half century of efforts to find, identify, and characterize a natural specimen of this important mineral.


I could not find the full copy yet, nor a simular article. Anyone?

http://www.livescience.com/46337-elusiv ... anite.html



?#1.
The mineral likely resides beneath Earth's surface in an area called the lower mantle, between the transition zone in the mantle and the core-mantle boundary, or between the depths of416 and 1,802 miles (670 and 2,900 kilometers), scientists said.

Scientists have been searching for the mineral for a long time, because in order to identify a mineral one must know its chemical composition and crystal structure, Ma said.

So is it "shock-produced", or planet guts ?


?#2. What did "impact" ? ?
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Re: "the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteor

Unread postby MrAmsterdam » Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:25 pm

seasmith wrote:
So is it "shock-produced", or planet guts ?


?#2. What did "impact" ? ?


Exactly my thoughts, two different explanations?!

So I wonder about a third option; the mineral as somekind of plasma crystals deposite in a low density cold gas and dust environment, maybe sparc/discharge related.
Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -Nikola Tesla -1934
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Re: "the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteor

Unread postby viscount aero » Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:51 am

seasmith wrote:
Dotini wrote:

MrAmsterdam wrote:
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6213/1100

Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite

Meteorites exposed to high pressures and temperatures during impact-induced shock often contain minerals whose occurrence and stability normally confine them to the deeper portions of Earth’s mantle. One exception has been MgSiO3 in the perovskite structure, which is the most abundant solid phase in Earth. Here we report the discovery of this important phase as a mineral in the Tenham L6 chondrite and approved by the International Mineralogical Association (specimen IMA 2014-017). MgSiO3-perovskite is now called bridgmanite. The associated phase assemblage constrains peak shock conditions to ~ 24 gigapascals and 2300 kelvin. The discovery concludes a half century of efforts to find, identify, and characterize a natural specimen of this important mineral.


I could not find the full copy yet, nor a simular article. Anyone?

http://www.livescience.com/46337-elusiv ... anite.html



?#1.
The mineral likely resides beneath Earth's surface in an area called the lower mantle, between the transition zone in the mantle and the core-mantle boundary, or between the depths of416 and 1,802 miles (670 and 2,900 kilometers), scientists said.

Scientists have been searching for the mineral for a long time, because in order to identify a mineral one must know its chemical composition and crystal structure, Ma said.

So is it "shock-produced", or planet guts ?


?#2. What did "impact" ? ?


Meteorite shock stage
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteorite_shock_stage

Meteorite shock stage is a measure of the degree of fracturing of the matrix of a common chondrite meteorite.[1] Impacts on the parent body of a meteoroid can produce very large pressures. These pressures heat, melt and deform the rocks. This is called shock metamorphism. Meteorites are often given a rating from 1 to 6 showing the level of shock metamorphism. However, the degree of shock can vary within a meteorite on the scale of centimeters
-------------

The problem with the whole story is how they assume anyone can know what is deep within Earth's lower mantle. I'm not a geologist but has anything ever been recovered from the depths that they are talking about? Have oil drills gone as deep as 416 to 1,802 miles (670-2,900 kilometers)? That's the depth of the width of several states. I find it hard to believe they have rock samples from that depth to compare the meteorite with.
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Re: "the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteor

Unread postby viscount aero » Fri Dec 12, 2014 1:19 am

I was always under the impression that the Olivine mineral group was most abundant. So I looked it up because I realize that science PRs are some truth mixed in with lots of highly fantastic guessing framed as facts of authority.

As is typical for PRs, the reporting is highly abridged and lacking. The conclusion is, in my opinion, another overly-confident and reaching assumption by establishment science ensconced in "scientism" and the "settled science" paradigm. In my opinion, this is an example of that.

Bridgmanite is an Olivine under high compression. So they are assuming that an Olivine-rich meteorite under "high shock" created "Bridgmanite" and that this "must be" the most abundant mineral phase inside the mantle of the Earth!

They assume that this is the "most abundant mineral on Earth" because Olivines are the most abundant mineral. And the "shock phased" (highly compressed) meteorite is "evidence" of what lies in Earth's mantle.

This is the kind of slippery slope and far-fetched presumptuousness that led the establishment to declare as a fact that comets "seeded the Earth's oceans." But when the Deuterium ratios of the alien water vapor on 67P didn't "match" the Earth then they went to "asteroids" as being the "ocean seeds of Earth." In other words they went to an even more outrageous model to account for the origin Earth's oceans.

I would not trust the information in the PR about the Bridgmanite. It's highly presumptuous. What they are doing is declaring so boldly, so assuredly, that the "most abundant mineral on Earth"--allegedly found in conditions thousands of miles into the deep Earth--is finally known based on a shocked meteorite!

Even if Bridgmanite is found at such depths, how they can declare it as the most abundant mineral is not scientifically valid of a claim. It is, at this stage, a hypothesized condition at best. But the PR reads as a confirmatory finding. This is exactly the same mentality that leads to dirty snowball theories. The brashness and assuredness of such a mindset is staggeringly ignorant.

In truth, they have no absolute confirmation, or even a solid clue, as to what is actually inside the mantle and at what ratios.

from:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/science ... d-17488897

"The Most Abundant Material on Earth Has Been Seen for the First Time

Hello, bridgmanite.
BY JOHN WENZ

December 2, 2014 4:54 PM

The mineral is believed to make up 36 percent of the total volume of Earth, making it the most abundant thing on our planet. Yet it is found so deep down below the surface—410 to 1615 miles—that it’s never been seen before. Those depths are so volatile that even if we could dig down there, the samples would be destroyed before they could be studied.

Now scientists have finally succeed in getting a glimpse of this stuff, which they just named bridgmanite (you can’t name a mineral until you’ve actually observed the thing). And they did it by a circuitous route—they looked for it in meteors.

Specifically, they dug into shocked meteors, which are formed under spurts of intense pressure, such as when one asteroid slams into another. This makes the meteors a sort of microcosm of Earth, and a way for scientists to see what kind of minerals form under high pressures like those inside our planet.

We still don’t know how bridgmanite behaves within the lower mantle of Earth. But at least the mineral made of magnesium, silicon, and oxygen finally has been positively identified and given a name."
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Re: Electric Meteors and Meteorites

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Jan 06, 2015 12:24 pm

This video clip on this page seems to show ball lightning, perhaps, originating from the meteor.

Mystery of the glowing orb: Bizarre fireball that splits in two could be a meteorite burning up in Earth's atmosphere

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ornia.html
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Electric Meteors and Meteorites

Unread postby S Freeman » Thu Jan 08, 2015 7:15 pm

Mystery of the glowing orb: Bizarre fireball that splits in two could be a meteorite burning up in Earth's atmosphere


Yes, I saw that. at first I thought it may have been a lens flare, but it didn't deviate when he panned the camera. So its not an image artifact.

The speed of the meteor was a bit slow. Terrestrial perhaps?

Untitled.jpg
Object splits from this point in trajectory..


A Plasmoid seeking charge equilibrium?
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Are the Perseid meteors evidence of 'thunderbolts'?

Unread postby willendure » Fri Aug 14, 2015 12:57 am

So for a topical subject...

We are currently in the period where earth passes through the Perseid meteors. How did those meteors get where they currently are, conveniently located so that once a year the earth coincides with their orbit around the sun?

Does anyone think that perhaps they got where they are precisely because they originated as material from either the earth or the moon? Have any ever been studied as to their composition, and are they known to have the same composition as earth or moon rock?
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Re: Are the Perseid meteors evidence of 'thunderbolts'?

Unread postby nick c » Fri Aug 14, 2015 2:31 pm

Meteor showers seem to be associated with the disintegration or debris trail of a specific comet.
The parent comet of the Perseids is thought to be Comet Swift-Tuttle.

Seems reasonable enough.
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Re: Are the Perseid meteors evidence of 'thunderbolts'?

Unread postby willendure » Tue Aug 18, 2015 8:39 am

I wondered if the fact that their orbit coincides with earths is just luck, or could it be evidence that material was electrically removed from the earth or moon, and subsequently that the orbits of that material and our own orbit have a point in common.
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Re: Are the Perseid meteors evidence of 'thunderbolts'?

Unread postby nick c » Tue Aug 25, 2015 7:01 pm

That is certainly a possibility. Well, let us just say that if the comet was formerly a part of the Earth's surface then one should not be surprised that the orbits of both bodies would intersect at some point.
That being said, we really cannot make that connection with any degree of certainty, since the intersection could have a variety of other explanations or possibilities.
Comets have cigar shaped (elliptical) orbits and they leave a debris trail in the path of their orbit. Most bodies in the solar system travel in the same plane (the ecliptic) so it is expected that at some point the Earth or any planet whose orbit is within the aphelion of the comet will cross that debris field. To make a long story short, Mars, Venus, and Mercury (and possibly other planets) probably all cross the debris field at some point in their orbit.
I suppose within the context of the EU the comet could have been excavated from any of those bodies.
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Re: Are the Perseid meteors evidence of 'thunderbolts'?

Unread postby willendure » Wed Aug 26, 2015 3:18 am

Does the perihelion of Swift-Tuttle not coincide closely with our own orbit? That is to say that our orbital paths are very close to tangential at that point. This suggests we have held a common trajectory at some point and that the comet may have been ejected from the earth or moon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comet_Swi ... 0%93Tuttle
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Fireballs in the Sky

Unread postby comingfrom » Fri Jan 15, 2016 5:09 am

I discovered an awesome smart phone app for the EU enthusiast. Just had to tell you about it.

Download it and check it out. It's free. (Search for "Fireballs in the Sky" in the app store.)

It's an app for reporting sightings of meteors, but also has a star map (aim your phone towards the star and the map lines up and you can read the star's name). and best of all, video clips of sightings.

Watching the video clips, a lot of them are simple shooting stars, but some of them are not simple.
Some of them display very dynamic electrical events.

Some appear to be repulsed back out into space! These surprised me. I don't know if it is an optical illusion effect caused by their method of taking the images and compiling the clip, but they definitely look as if they change direction suddenly when they get close, and curve back out to space. This project was set up to study the trajectories of meteors, but I haven't ever read anything about meteors that get repulsed yet.
Check the two on 19 August 2015 at 10:19 to see what I'm talking about.

Others end in a spectacular bright flash. Some of the flashes have clear concentric circles of different colors. Definitely looks like electrical phenomena to me.
There was two of these on 10 July 2014, at 9:45pm and 11:47pm (another also at 9:45pm had a nice flash, but not the concentric colored circles).

Here is the link to their website.
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