Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:56 pm

kiwi wrote:
Lloyd wrote:Asteroid Too
Electrical Sonic Booms
Charles Chandler figured out that sonic booms seem to be a result of a bow shock of negative electric charge in front of objects,



For example, sound is not a vibration of the air. A sound wave, we know today, is an electromagnetic process involving the rapid assembly and disassembly of geometrical configurations of molecules. In modern physics, this kind of self-organizing process is known as a "soliton." Although much more detailed experimental work needs to be done, we know in principle that different frequencies of coherent solitons correspond to distinct geometries on the microscopic or quantum level of organization of the process. This was already indicated by the work of Helmholtz's contemporary, Bernhard Riemann, who refuted most of the acoustic doctrines of Helmholtz in his 1859 paper on acoustical shock waves.1


http://www.schillerinstitute.org/fid_91 ... _tune.html


Sparky, I dont now how to "upload" images here , but if you have an e-mail addy I can chop that vid into as many "stills" as you want.


I think it was Solar (or Web-o) who posted a link that contained an article on the craft ( pre Lacross) that impacted the Moon some years back on an old thread I was browsing last week,.It said that although no "flash" was detected they did record "whistlers" co-inciding with the crash ... whistler waves are an EM function as we know, ... not much chance of any "data" along those lines being around I guess concerning this event ? :|


There is a yahoo group of VLF device users. They are very aware of wistlers and are likely to have
internatioal participants. d...z

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/VLF_ ... =414798274

...
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby kiwi » Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:27 pm

There is a yahoo group of VLF device users. They are very aware of wistlers and are likely to have
internatioal participants. d...z

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/VLF_ ... =414798274


Thanks D 8-)
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby kiwi » Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:32 pm

The link is a "dead end" unfortunately Dahlenaz :cry:

But I should be capable of finding some outfit along the same lines .. cheers anyway :D
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:58 pm

Sparky wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBvotWfR3j4

I don't know the frame rate on these cameras, but this is the only video that shows the electrical discharge to Earth. At 47 sec. you can see the beginning of the discharge straight down. As the charge builds into a blinding flash, at 48 sec, notice that a huge area below the meteor is glowing. Then at 50 sec. the downward discharge is gone and there is still a strong glow {discharge} along the meteor's path. No telling how many pieces are now in the sky.

The meteor may have made an electrical connection from the ionosphere to Earth, which resulted in the huge flash.

If there is a way to break down the video into smaller sections, we might beable to study in more detail. The hole in the ice may have been a residual discharge within the fragments found around the hole.

If you look at satellite images of that area you will see many craters/lakes.

Seems to be a meteor magnet.... :D

edit; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ozSq3yEm3g

the two twisting trails could be the birkeland currents from the ionsophere, unless these hypervelocity rocks can make curlycues... :D


Here is a screen shot of a frame near the time you speak of,,, please identify for us the detail
which you see as an arc...

Image
http://para-az.com/hydraulic-craters/lu ... .30.59.jpg

Do keep in mind that the video is shot through a windsheild. d...z

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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:08 pm

kiwi wrote:The link is a "dead end" unfortunately Dahlenaz :cry:

But I should be capable of finding some outfit along the same lines .. cheers anyway :D



Sorry about that,, This one should get you there. d...z

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/VLF_Group/?yguid=414798274

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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby justcurious » Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:16 am

Regarding the video about the shooting down of the meteor, it does not seem real to me. In other videos, we do see there seems to be a plume of sorts being ejected on the side of the meteor. However I wouldn't trust those close-ups showing slow motion high definition objects/rockets flying out of the meteor. Technically, it's possible to increase the definition/resolution of poor quality recordings with some signal processing if you know enough about the camera and specifications and defects, but there are limits there too. Youtube is full of pranks. The Russians seem to have a pretty good sense of humour, such as showing superman crawling out of the meteor crater, and other embellishments (some a lot more subtle).
The other problem is the quality of the authentic videos. For example the image below submitted by sparky. I was watching that video many times and figured (watch carefuly) it was a smudge either on the cam or on the windshield.

Image

There is still no explanation for the explosion and the event in general from official sources (just the usual "made up" stuff). Here are some interesting views from the mainstream science news outlets:

Q & A with Marc Fries - Smithsonian Meteor Expert
http://smithsonianscience.org/2013/02/r ... an-expert/
Very peculiar question and answer:
Q. Are the pieces of meteorite hot when they hit the ground?
A. No – actually quite the opposite. They tend to be freezing cold. It’s a funny thing. Basically as they travel through space they are probably in the tens of Kelvin temperature range [50 degrees Kelvin equals -370 degrees Fahrenheit]. Although the fireball itself is extraordinarily hot—enough to melt stone—it only lasts a few seconds. There is not enough heat there to heat up the whole thing. So the effect you get is something like deep-fried ice cream. You can fry ice cream and end up with a crispy crust, but the inside is still frozen. That’s pretty much the same effect you get with meteorites. They’ll have a freshly molten outside but the inside will still retain the deep cold of space.


Hmmm, I would have thought that iron is a good heat conductor, and that the core would be hot especialy after a 20x hiroshima blast. Exploding fried ice-cream?

There is now a pretty good entry in wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Russian_meteor_event

Ethan - PHD in Astrophysics and university professor
http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang ... r-explode/
According to Ethan, it's very simple. The dirty snowball has trapped ice inside the meteor. As the meteor heats up, the ice/water starts to boil until it breaks the meteor up. After that, "physics will take care of the rest: convert that kinetic energy into heat energy" (and create a blast equivalent of half a million tonnes of TNT). I guess he never got the memo that the dirty snowballs hypothesis was disproved by observation. Interesting comments on his blog. The "flying kettle" hypothesis :roll:
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby Sparky » Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:10 am

Do keep in mind that the video is shot through a windsheild. d...z


True....I was only giving my viewpoint, while realizing that some lens artifact could have produced what I was seeing.

I think that sequence, 47sec thru 50sec. needs to be looked at as continuous, with a leader discharge, beginning at 47, and with the large discharge following.
Notice that the area below the meteorite at that time appears to be conical, and transient.

Anyway, that is what i see, but will entertain any other explanation.

How many frames/sec is obtained by such imaging?
"It is dangerous to be right in matters where established men are wrong."
"Doubt is not an agreeable condition, but certainty is an absurd one."
"Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby Siggy_G » Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:27 am

Corona wrote:this video really caught my attention:

not sure how to explain this, but something definitely seems to interact with the meteor. Perhaps it is also coming from the side as the viewing angle makes this hard to distinguish. But if it really is something that hit the meteor, what could possibly have caused this??? (...)


These appear like front window streaks that catches the highlights, that appear vertically, horisontally or radially on diffent videos. Camera lens artifacts (over exposure etc) is another issue in some videos.
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby flippinrocks » Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:45 am

I have an observation that may be interesting. The Sun seems to be directly behind the meteor. Would it be too far fetched looking into Sun activity prior to the this event to determine whether the meteor came from the Sun?

Also, I'd like to add that I am in agreement with sparky that there was indeed a discharge to the ground. To dispel the artifact argument, I'm thinking of using a spotlight or better yet a welder set at an angle mimicking the angle of flare on a windshield at night.
wow, look how bright that star is!
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby GaryN » Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:47 am

What might really help determine conventional vs EM processes would be mult-spectral imaging, which I'd think would be available from one of the eyes-in-the-sky that the big powers watch each other with continually. Hopefully something will be available eventually.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby Dotini » Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:40 pm

http://en.ria.ru/russia/20130217/179531 ... tists.html

Meteorites located make it a chondrite, 10% iron.

Respectfully submitted,
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Russian Stony Meteorite Comp Matches Asteroid 2012 DA14

Unread postby quantauniverse » Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:24 pm

Asteroid 2012 DA14 is classified as a S-type asteroid, which has the same composition as stony meteorites. Only 17% of all asteroids are S-type asteroids, consisting mostly of iron-magnesium silicates. The Russian meteorite samples are of this same stony composition, consisting of about 8 percent iron, and have olivine and sulfur. The probability that the compositions of the meteorite samples and the asteroid would be the same if they are an unrelated event, is less than 25%. People reported terrible smells in the air, and this can be attributed to the burning of sulfur compounds in the meteorite. NASA has no explanation using gravity theories to explain how the near passing of a massive asteroid is related to meteor sightings in Russian, San Francisco, and Cuba. Earth's magnetosphere and the interplanetary magnetic field, may have created a magnetic anomaly that deflected the orbits of associated fragments travelling with the asteroid. These scientific facts and photos are up in the story at
http://holographicgalaxy.blogspot.com/2 ... ikely.html
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby seasmith » Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:34 pm

Dotini » Mon Feb 18, 2013

http://en.ria.ru/russia/20130217/179531 ... tists.html

Meteorites located make it a chondrite, 10% iron.



So 90% mostly semi-conductor (the shrapnel is being described as "glassy").
Iron makes a good transistor dopant.

In a conventional semiconductor diode, conduction takes place while the p–n junction is forward biased and blocks current flow when the junction is reverse biased. This occurs up to a point known as the “reverse breakdown voltage” when conduction begins (often accompanied by destruction of the device).


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnel_diode

http://www.google.com/search?client=saf ... 8&oe=UTF-8
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby dahlenaz » Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:45 pm

With reference to the fragments which can be seen continuing on beyond the flash point can we possibly
calculate which one ended up at the lake location?

if we can assume that the luminous fragments begin to transition into vertical freefall shortly after
they loose their luminosity, then the two shown at the right of this image may be candidates. The third
is way out of frame and continues to remain luminous for another 3 seconds, or six seconds from brightest
of the two last flashs.
If we use a re-entry velocity of 30 km/sec the two bright fragments may have overshot the 50 mile mark
made in the lake,, If we use the 40,000 mph one given by one new source then they are a bit closer,
but i am sure someone here can calculate this better than i since the limits of my
calculations are based on objects dropped from planes,, which transitions to freefall in about 5 seconds at
100mph. I suspect the calculation is not directly proportional. d...z

Image
http://para-az.com/chelyabinsk-meteor/f ... 0-s75t.jpg

you might see from an overhead view at this link that several objects hit the ice:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJAKWH52KSY

...
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Re: Feb 15 Meteorite(s) hit Russia - Analysis

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Feb 19, 2013 12:00 am

With reference to the fragments which can be seen continuing on beyond the flash point can we possibly calculate which one ended up at the lake location?


I read one account today that says because they can not find a piece of the comet in the lake, then the hole is not from the comet, but maybe an ice fishing hole, though nobody has come forward yet claiming they made it. It would be logical to assume no piece/s in the lake, no impact, in a purely mechanical world of course.

you might see from an overhead view at this link that several objects hit the ice:


Not sure about that video, his other work seems to be all CGI stuff. Wonder what the source of the footage is?
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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