Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological models,

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Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological models,

Unread postby The Great Dog » Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:36 am

https://news.uci.edu/2018/02/01/distant-galaxy-group-contradicts-common-cosmological-models-simulations/

Irvine, Calif., Feb. 1, 2018 – An international team of astronomers has determined that Centaurus A, a massive elliptical galaxy 13 million light-years from Earth, is accompanied by a number of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the main body in a narrow disk. In a paper published today in Science, the researchers note that this is the first time such a galactic arrangement has been observed outside the Local Group, home to the Milky Way.

“The significance of this finding is that it calls into question the validity of certain cosmological models and simulations as explanations for the distribution of host and satellite galaxies in the universe,” said co-author Marcel Pawlowski, a Hubble Fellow in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine.

He said that under the lambda cold dark matter model, smaller systems of stars should be more or less randomly scattered around their anchoring galaxies and should move in all directions. Yet Centaurus A is the third documented example, behind the Milky Way and Andromeda, of a “vast polar structure” in which satellite dwarves co-rotate around a central galactic mass in what Pawlowski calls “preferentially oriented alignment.”

The difficulty of studying the movements of dwarf satellites around their hosts varies according to the target galaxy group. It’s relatively easy for the Milky Way. “You get proper motions,” Pawlowski said. “You take a picture now, wait three years or more, and then take another picture to see how the stars have moved; that gives you the tangential velocity.”

Using this technique, scientists have measurements for 11 Milky Way satellite galaxies, eight of which are orbiting in a tight disk perpendicular to the spiral galaxy’s plane. There are probably other satellites in the system that can’t be seen from Earth because they’re blocked by the Milky Way’s dusty disk.

Andromeda provides observers on Earth a view of the full distribution of satellites around the galaxy’s sprawling spiral. An earlier study found 27 dwarf galaxies, 15 arranged in a narrow plane. And Andromeda offers another advantage, according to Pawlowski: “Because you see the galaxy almost edge-on, you can look at the line-of-sight velocities of its satellites to see the ones that are approaching and those that are receding, so it very clearly presents as a rotating disk.”

Centaurus A is much farther away, and its satellite companions are faint, making it more difficult to accurately measure distances and velocities to determine movements and distributions. But “sleeping in the archives,” Pawlowski said, were data on 16 of Centaurus A’s satellites.

“We could do the same game as with Andromeda, where we look at the line-of-sight velocities,” he said. “And again we see that half of them are red-shifted, meaning they are receding from us, and the other half are blue-shifted, which tells us they are approaching.”

The researchers were able to demonstrate that 14 of the 16 Centaurus A satellite galaxies follow a common motion pattern and rotate along the plane around the main galaxy – contradicting frequently used cosmological models and simulations suggesting that only about 0.5 percent of satellite galaxy systems in the nearby universe should exhibit this pattern.

So this means that we are missing something,” Pawlowski said. “Either the simulations lack some important ingredient, or the underlying model is wrong. This research may be seen as support for looking into alternative models.”

Co-authors on this study are Oliver Müller of the University of Basel in Switzerland, Helmut Jerjen of Australian National University, and Federico Lelli of the European Southern Observatory in Germany. Pawlowski was backed by a Hubble Fellowship grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute and NASA.


http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2009/arch09/091125bigproblems.htm

Considering Peratt's hypothesis, galaxies are most likely electrical in nature—electromagnetic forces act on them with such power that gravity can be ignored when discussing their shapes and behavior.

Electricity flows through a galaxy like the Milky Way along the polar axis and then back through the spiral arms. There is most likely a circuit across the galactic disk that divides, flowing upward and downward from the north and south axes. This circuit receives its driving power from Birkeland currents that connect the galaxy with the rest of the Universe where, presumably, billion-light-year long strands of magnetically confined electric filaments are transmitting power from one end of space to the other.

As the intergalactic Birkeland currents move through the center of the Milky Way, they may also generate a toroidal particle beam at the edge of the disk, which would energize a ring of stars. Observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have uncovered such a ring in the form of a separate structure that surrounds the galaxy at a reported distance of 120,000 light years.

Since the dwarf galaxies are also rotating in the galactic plane along with the ring, it seems logical to conclude that one force is acting on both. Electromagnetism, being substantially more powerful than gravity, causes the ring of stars and the dwarf galaxies to be aligned at right angles to the axial intergalactic magnetic field. The speed of the stellar motion—considered anomalous by the consensus view—is also explained by the stronger force of electromagnetic attraction.
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby MotionTheory » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:01 am

Be patience... Soon, LCDM will evolves to LCDTG (Lamda Cold Duct Tape GlueOn) :oops:
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby Cargo » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:04 pm

Get a load of this gigantic lie from the mainstream guardians as Arsholestech.
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/02 ... cal-model/

dark matter tends to form filaments, and the filaments' gravitational effects work like invisible highways in space, channeling matter in a particular direction.


I can't git any more palms on my face, but I keep trying.
interstellar filaments conducted electricity having currents as high as 10 thousand billion amperes
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Wed Feb 07, 2018 1:25 pm

Cargo wrote:Get a load of this gigantic lie from the mainstream guardians as Arsholestech.
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/02 ... cal-model/

dark matter tends to form filaments, and the filaments' gravitational effects work like invisible highways in space, channeling matter in a particular direction.


I can't git any more palms on my face, but I keep trying.


I hear your, and I feel your pain. :)

The LCDM model has failed *billions* of dollars worth of so called "tests" in the lab including tests at LHC, LUX, PandaX, Xenon-1T, etc, and it's failed more observational "tests" than it passes. Apparently LCDM's big remaining claim to fame is the background temperature of the CMB which Eddington explained using the scattering of starlight on the dust in space. Their model actually fails the CMB tests too because there are hemispheric variations observed by Planck that defy Guth's claim of homogeneity.

If it weren't for pure momentum, LCDM would be dead and buried a long time ago.

The only thing that is keeping the "cold dark matter" claim alive is the fact that their computer models won't work right without it. Without exotic matter they also fail to match their current nucleosynthesis predictions, and the power spectrum of the CMB. They therefore continue to bury their collective heads in the sand with respect to any test that produces negative results or which their model simply fails to match observations (like this one).

LCDM proponents have the worst case of confirmation bias in the history of physics.
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby Metryq » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:08 pm

Michael Mozina wrote:LCDM proponents have the worst case of confirmation bias in the history of physics.

It's a zombie theory
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby kasim » Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:03 am

Since Dark Matter can only be detected by gravity and nothing else, it implies that it's a flaw in the laws of gravitation. Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's general relativity may operate within a strict domain of validity which has a tight range and are being used beyond that range hence the flaw.

This also suggests that the so-called singularity cannot and doesn't exist as the distance can never become zero since matter and energy are quantised.
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Re: Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological mod

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:20 am

kasim wrote:Since Dark Matter can only be detected by gravity and nothing else, it implies that it's a flaw in the laws of gravitation. Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's general relativity may operate within a strict domain of validity which has a tight range and are being used beyond that range hence the flaw.


I think the real problem is that gravity simply isn't the *only* relevant force/feature of spacetime. It works well to explain the movement patterns of objects in our solar system, but it's doesn't work well to explain high energy plasma events, or the movement of galaxies because electricity also plays a role in these formation patterns as Perratt's work so clearly demonstrated.

Gravity does obviously exist, and it has *some* influence on objects in space, but it's not the *only* force of nature that has an effect on objects in space as the solar wind demonstrates. I think the real problem is that astronomers are desperate to downplay the role of electric fields in space so they try to use gravity like a sledge hammer to explain everything. That's the real problem IMO.

This also suggests that the so-called singularity cannot and doesn't exist as the distance can never become zero since matter and energy are quantised.


If the whole universe had actually been compressed to something smaller than a basketball (or a proton according to Guth), the event horizon (Schwartzchild radius) around that massive object would have prevented anything from ever escaping, including light.

The "big bang" model requires a miracle of *epic* proportions from the instant it tries to 'expand".
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