Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Plasma and electricity in space. Failure of gravity-only cosmology. Exposing the myths of dark matter, dark energy, black holes, neutron stars, and other mathematical constructs. The electric model of stars. Predictions and confirmations of the electric comet.

Moderators: MGmirkin, bboyer

Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Wed Dec 27, 2017 2:25 pm

https://arxiv.org/abs/1510.07683

I've recently gotten a lot more interested in studying cosmic rays and thinking about their content and their implication as it relates to solar physics and astrophysics.

In terms of the highest speed charged particles in the universe, the fastest, most abundant forms of current which we observe from space are contained in high speed ions that are slamming onto the suns atmosphere, and all of the various bodies in the solar system constantly. Apparently 99 percent of all cosmic rays are positively charged ions. About 1 percent of cosmic rays are pretty evenly divided between electrons and positrons, with positrons being fewer in number at the lower kinetic energy states while composing a majority at the higher kinetic energy states. if we assume that the electrons and positron "ambiplasma" is pretty much net neutral with respect to charge, that means that the vast majority of the inbound flow of high speed charged particles are net positive ions of various types.

IMO, that particular observation of the relative charge of "space', tends to support Birkeland's cathode solar model better than it supports Juergen's anode model.

The paper would also seem to imply that electrons are less massive, and therefore their loss of kinetic energy is more affected by Bremsstrahlung than heavier high speed ions. That would tend to explain why there's such a high ratio of ions vs high speed electrons/positrons.

The cosmic rays seem to all show a pattern that is consistent with a single source as I'm "interpreting' the paper.

Does that seem like a reasonable premise and interpretation to others, or am I just being biased, and/or am I missing something important here? I'm really looking for feedback on this issue.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby D_Archer » Thu Dec 28, 2017 3:42 am

Very interesting to think about, i do not have an answer really.

I did find this picture interesting, the moon seen in gamma ray energy levels:

Image

What does it mean for the Sun.....

Regards,
Daniel
- Shoot Forth Thunder -
User avatar
D_Archer
 
Posts: 1150
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:01 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:09 pm

D_Archer wrote:Very interesting to think about, i do not have an answer really.

I did find this picture interesting, the moon seen in gamma ray energy levels:

Image

What does it mean for the Sun.....

Regards,
Daniel


I would say that it means that all of the objects inside the solar system are being constantly bombarded by positively charged ions moving at very high speeds. These high speed ions slam into every surface/atmosphere generating gamma radiation in their wake. The sun's solar wind helps to shield us from some of it, but a lot of it still reaches us here on Earth.

http://crop.unl.edu/about/faq.html

The flux of cosmic rays falls off rapidly as the cosmic ray energy increases. For 1 GeV particles, the rate is about 10,000 per square meter per second. At 1000 GeV (or 1012 eV), the rate is only 1 particle per square meter per second.


Evidently most of the ions are hitting the Earth at an energy state of 1Gev at a rate of around 10,000 per square meter per second. I'd imagine that since the moon has a thinner atmosphere more cosmic rays strike the lunar surface per square meter.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby kodybatill » Thu Dec 28, 2017 6:02 pm

D_Archer wrote:Very interesting to think about, i do not have an answer really.

I did find this picture interesting, the moon seen in gamma ray energy levels:

Image

What does it mean for the Sun.....

Regards,
Daniel


Also, amongst 28 main positrons/colors around opposites - all of them except for magenta, are similar enough to the 8 main colors (including pink) of a rainbow - that during the creation of Gamma radiation, all of it's signatures find their way back to the similar type of element, and co-create small amounts of those 8 positrons or colors around opposites of a rainbow - while magenta, because of being similar to too many other colors - might stay very close around the location where the Gamma rays started, or particles that are not reaching the location until later than it's related surrounding particles. That picture of yours is in magenta - but I also write about this in my book.
kodybatill
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:28 pm

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Fri Dec 29, 2017 3:15 pm

I really don't understand how I could have scientifically overlooked cosmic rays as a source of external current and external kinetic energy flowing into the planets and into the solar atmosphere for so long. The more I study and think about the (near light) speed velocity of the positive composition of cosmic rays, the more I realize that Birkeland correctly predicted the relative charge of the surface of the sun with respect to "space", but there's a bit more to the story because high speed charged particle current is also flowing inbound toward the sun at some 87+ percent of the speed of light, up to 99+ percent of the speed of light depending on the specific cosmic ray and it's source.

Cosmic rays demonstrate the fact that there is a net positive flow of charged ions flowing through our solar system and into the sun 24/7, so the concept of including the effects (and physics) of inbound charged particle flow is ultimately appropriate. Juergen's may have gotten the polarity backwards, but he was probably on the right track in terms of the need to add the kinetic energy of external current, and the resistance to the high speed flow of that external current into the equations.

I suspect that these high speed ion streams sometimes show up as 'coronal rain' in the solar atmosphere as they bombard the surface of sun with streams of high speed positively charged ions. A high speed inbound flow of current really would tend to explain a lot of about a few of the solar images that I still struggle with, coronal rain images as well.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby nick c » Fri Dec 29, 2017 8:41 pm

Cosmic rays demonstrate the fact that there is a net positive flow of charged ions flowing through our solar system and into the sun 24/7,
This conclusion is not warranted as Voyager 1 has detected a net negative flow coming into the solar system from interstellar space.
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2011-372
At the same time, Voyager has detected a 100-fold increase in the intensity of high-energy electrons from elsewhere in the galaxy diffusing into our solar system from outside, which is another indication of the approaching boundary.
User avatar
nick c
Moderator
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:12 pm
Location: connecticut

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby kodybatill » Sat Dec 30, 2017 11:27 pm

nick c wrote:
Cosmic rays demonstrate the fact that there is a net positive flow of charged ions flowing through our solar system and into the sun 24/7,
This conclusion is not warranted as Voyager 1 has detected a net negative flow coming into the solar system from interstellar space.
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2011-372
At the same time, Voyager has detected a 100-fold increase in the intensity of high-energy electrons from elsewhere in the galaxy diffusing into our solar system from outside, which is another indication of the approaching boundary.


In space - negative charges mostly come in the form of Near-infra-red inert gases or Muons - because of near infra-red electrons causing electron neutrinos to take positrons. Now there is A LOT of Near-infra-red inert gases outside of our Solar System - but for some reason - there is a VERY strong Muonic/Near-infra-red inert gas element on Earth - that pulls more of these negative charges to itself. These negative charges are measured by the change in mass between particles, - and +.

Now positive charges in space mostly come from Transition Metals - and also Gamma rays after various sources like the beta-decay and other forms of decay, mostly of Muonic Hydrogen and it's concealers. Now there is actually more positive charge out-side of our Solar System than there is inside of it - and so the decay information that heads out of our Solar System seeks it out to equalize - but because of there being more positive charge out-side of our Solar System - the outer Universe generally does not need to or even want to take on extra positive charges - besides the decay information from our Solar System reaching it's similar elements outside. So then whole entire charges of various sizes make their way at truly top speeds - toward Earth and our Solar System - however unlike with net negative charge - net positive charge is measured by the similarity in mass, like certain decay rates and their dispersion.
The flow into our Solar System is truly both positive and negative - and only changes depending on the means of measurement. Although honestly - net positive charge can become net negative charge - if more mass is accumulated from Gamma radiation dispersion and reclamation than was already there – a reaction with a wide array of similar elements in our Solar System. So I would say there is indeed a good chance that our Solar System is at a net negative charge.
kodybatill
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:28 pm

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Solar » Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:50 am

Michael Mozina wrote:I really don't understand how I could have scientifically overlooked cosmic rays as a source of external current and external kinetic energy flowing into the planets and into the solar atmosphere for so long.


Thats odd. There are very interesting relationships that exist with CR's and its unfortunate that the term "rays" obscures their intense electrical nature. CR's ionize planetary atmospheres via the induction of "air showers" which can include local on the spot secondary production of electrons. Cosmic Rays have also been observed to create "hot spots". When a celestial body with a magnetic field deflects their trajectory the resulting deficit (a decrease in body centered CR's owing to the deflection) presents what is termed a "cosmic ray shadow". Oddly enough when CR's induce secondary "air showers" via interactions with the atmospheres of celestial bodies, and/or dry airless moons, the term "absorbed" is rare to find. But yes, certain ranges of CR's are "absorbed" by the Sun:

The magnetic field of the Solar corona is difficult to measure directly. However, indirect observations of the solar corona are possible using the deficit in flux of cosmic rays coming from the direction of the Sun. Low-energy cosmic rays (~GeV) are deflected by the inner magnetic field of the Sun and the interplanetary magnetic field frozen into the solar wind. In contrast, high-energy cosmic rays (~TeV and above) are absorbed in the Sun's photosphere producing a shadow in the Sun's nominal position viewed from Earth. Several ground-based instruments have observed the effects of the heliospheric magnetic field on the size of the sun shadow and its position. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is an air shower array located in the central region of Mexico that observes TeV cosmic rays at a rate of about 15 kHz. in this work, we present preliminary images of the sun shadow from data collected by HAWC during 2013 and 2014 for different energy ranges.- The Galactic cosmic-ray Sun shadow observed by HAWC: O. Enriquez, A. Lara, for the HAWC Collaboration


kodybatill wrote:The flow into our Solar System is truly both positive and negative ...


Agreed. The bidirectional proton-electron relationship afforded by CR's presents a vastly superior picture to anyone's [Electric] Current model(s) prioritized solely on the dynamics of electrons: Sharing this:

Electricity is more than just electrons

"Electricity" is not made of electrons (or to be more specific, Electric Charge, which is sometimes called "Quantity of Electricity," is not made of electrons.) Charge actually comes in two varieties: positive particles and negative. In the everyday world of electronics, these particles are the electrons and protons supplied by atoms in conductors.
(…)
Because the negative particles carry a name that sounds like "electricity," some beginners unfortunately start thinking that the electrons ARE the electricity, and they wrongly imagining that the protons (having a much less electrical name?) are not electrical. A few text and reference books even outright state this, saying that electricity is composed of electrons. Nope, wrong. In reality the electrons and protons carry electric charges of equal strength. If electrons are "electricity", then protons are "electricity" too.

Now everyone will rightly tell me that the protons within wires cannot flow, while the electrons can. Yes, this is true... but only true for metals. And it's only true for solid metals. All metals are composed of positively charged atoms immersed in a sea of movable electrons. When an electric current is created within a solid copper wire, the "electron sea" moves forward, but the protons within the positive atoms of copper do not. 

However, solid metals are not the only conductors, and in many other substances the positive atoms *do* move, and they *do* participate in the electric current. These various conductors are nothing exotic. They are very common, they all around us …
(…)
Our own nervous system is based on the two-way currents. We dare not think that a current in a metal wire is "real," while currents in human flesh somehow are not. - William Beaty: Which way does the "Electricity" really Flow?


One of those various non-metallic conductors all around us are PLASMAS where, unlike the wire supposedly, the protons (CR's) actually *do move*. Plasmas present the bidirectional nature of electric currents in what the article later refers to as "Two-Way. Pos/Neg Electric Currents". Thus, the picture presented is one where there could be little to no electron currents flowing into the Sun. Instead, inbound CR currents (approximately 90% protons at Earth) of opposite charge are a better bidirectional fit to naturally correlate with electrons flowing in the opposite direction AWAY from the Sun - as observed.

An 'electrons only' approach to electricity - was briefly discussed in the Alfven & Jergens Circuit thread. This is perhaps the reason that despite Bob Johnson's efforts (See Links: Is the Electric Sun Model Dead?), in examining the various Electric Sun approaches, to find evidence of inbound electrons was not successful. That's because, as William Beaty's article states, "Electricity is more than just electrons". Thinking themselves to mimic Cosmic dynamics the LHC accelerates What? Protons:

"The proton source is a simple bottle of hydrogen gas. An electric field is used to strip hydrogen atoms of their electrons to yield protons." - Source

Therefore, one does not necessarily need to speculate a prodigious source of inbound electron currents when perfectly natural bidirectional "Two-Way Pos/Neg Electric Currents" as exhibited in Nature will do. Consider also that…

Resonant circuits exhibit ringing and can generate higher voltages and currents than are fed into them." - Wiki


… and the regular oscillations of yonder "Singing Sun" begins to make sense in a way different to be sure.
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
User avatar
Solar
 
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:05 am

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby jacmac » Sun Dec 31, 2017 8:59 am

Yes.
Also, any particles, charged or not, coming into the VERY HOT Corona would be stripped down
to their basic parts; protons and electrons.
Adding to the fuel for an electric fire.
Not a fire as we know them caused by electricity,
but a fire OF ELECTRICITY.

Happy new year,
Jack
jacmac
 
Posts: 514
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 12:36 pm

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby kodybatill » Sun Dec 31, 2017 7:19 pm

Happy New Year!!!!

This is going to be simple but complex, so please hold with me.

So I just did some figuring with some models in my family book - and I think that gamma ray (particle) type energies, before becoming positive charges - can pass through plasma, and if they do, the neutron/circumference of all positrons/colors around opposites is replaced for the proton/volume of those positrons/colors around opposites now rising above each-other.
And then if able to come into contact with a Bose-Einstein condensate type material after that - or more simply, Universal Water - in-between the movement of any D/C vertical line - the proton/volume of something moving too fast to use, is replaced by the neutron/circumference of trying to slow that thing down - literally. But maybe a type of torque or vortex or plasmon could describe it - and also it's energy is divided by how-ever-many vertical moving electron neutrinos are moving through the Bose-Einstein condensate and the plasma.

And then if - what-ever is left over after the Bose-Einstein condensate - moves in more of a D/C vertical direction of up - the original energy of the Gamma rays have two more steps to get through before becoming a Net charge of the general positive charge at the end (which the end positive charge can be net negative AND net positive, periodically). These energies first have to move from the Bose-Einstein condensate/Universal water - to UV light or always first generation purple positrons - and at point of origination and mergence with more UV - the D/C vertical line now replaces the neutron/circumference of moving closer to neutron/circumference - with the proton/volume of taking electron neutrinos - again - all of this only occurs if the information present - has originated from Gamma radiation and different forms of decay - and moved through the steps mentioned, which sometimes the whole signal can just end at Gamma radiation if the appropriate elements are used as super conductors like phosphorus or even phosphorus positrons........

But then, if the information makes it past this, Positive charge is situated just beyond: Replacing the electron/diameter of moving closer to neutron/circumference - with the electron neutrino of taking positrons/colors around opposites.
At that point Transition metals take on a net positive charge, while causing extra positrons, neutrons, electrons, and electron neutrinos to be found in the plasma - but both can also become magnetized to repel or attract positive and negative charges in different ways. I believe that the seed signal of Transition metal information, is in the Muonic Hydrogen - which I believe was the very first element directly after the first existence of Positrons, which are not dark matter or, I would say, not even anti-matter - except that at certain points, the positrons/colors around opposites can cancel each-other out. There are positrons of so many different sizes, that if they completely cancel out even many times, it almost doesn't matter - the 28+1 different positrons that I know of, are very intricately linked. Large positrons wont cancel out, and will carry information sometimes of the smaller positrons that do cancel out - to far distances - or most of the time to a Muon or even Near-neutron inert gas - and can be taken all of a sudden by almost any size nucleus of near-infra-red Gases (some can be pretty big) and then bestow those Positrons very fast and at far distances (there are some Near-infra-red inert gases that have zero temperature, inertia and mass.) - But these are positrons that I am talking about - while the different energies move in different ways.

if a signal was to have started from Muons and Electron neutrinos merging together at first to create positrons at a much earlier time than the gamma signal and different forms of decay - the out-come would be slightly different. Near-infra-red inert gases would take the Positrons - and if started at Gamma rays - Near-neutron inert gases would take in the positrons - and give them over to some other force that accelerates these near-neutron inert gases - like electron neutrinos. This creates folds of attracting and repelling Near-neutron inert gases and electron neutrinos (which repel themselves) - that just may accelerate the electron neutrinos to close to the speed of light (along with some of the Positrons) - where as Near-infra-red inert gases achieve this inherently because of the Near-infra-red inert gas that is zero temperature, mass and inertia. It is all fractal and cyclic. And marvelous.
kodybatill
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:28 pm

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:06 pm

nick c wrote:
Cosmic rays demonstrate the fact that there is a net positive flow of charged ions flowing through our solar system and into the sun 24/7,
This conclusion is not warranted as Voyager 1 has detected a net negative flow coming into the solar system from interstellar space.
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2011-372
At the same time, Voyager has detected a 100-fold increase in the intensity of high-energy electrons from elsewhere in the galaxy diffusing into our solar system from outside, which is another indication of the approaching boundary.


While I've been reading cosmic ray papers, they typically use the term electron when discussing both electrons and positrons. It's a reference more to the size of the mass than to charge in some papers. I would expect that inbound electron flow would flow into the heliosphere and interact with the double layer of the heliosphere, whereas the high velocity cosmic ray ions will likely continue to move directly into the sun or planet at close to the speed of light and hardly interact with the double layer of the heliosphere.

I agree with those in this thread that have suggested that there are "circuit flow" patterns both into and out of the solar system. It's probably a very complicated and messy current flow pattern and not necessarily all one directional flow.

I think the only real way to sort this all out is in the lab by replicating all of Birkeland's full range of experiments, with both cathode and anode models. Only then will we know for sure which configuration works best in terms of matching up with solar physics. Birkeland and his team did experiment with both configurations, and he's been right about many other things, so I'm inclined to give Birkeland and his team the benefit of the doubt and benefit of the results from the full range of relevant testing.

I just never even considered cosmic rays as a form of current transfer until recently, but now that i'm finally "seeing it", I can't stop seeing it. I always assumed that the "primary" charge carrier particles in spacetime were the cathode rays and other moving electrons, but now I'm not so sure that was a safe bet. It seems to me that high speed ions can do something that high speed electrons and positrons cannot do, namely transmit electrical energy at nearly the speed of light over vast distances without being too encumbered by the plasma double layers of spacetime. Cosmic rays are the ultimate high velocity, long distance, electric charge transfer mechanism. I can't believe I've been blind to it for so long.
Last edited by Michael Mozina on Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby seasmith » Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:20 pm

Michael Mozina wrote:

... electric charge transfer mechanism [s]


That Is the key, isn't it ?

`
seasmith
 
Posts: 2710
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:59 pm

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:37 pm

seasmith wrote:
Michael Mozina wrote:

... electric charge transfer mechanism [s]


That Is the key, isn't it ?

`


I believe so. I think the other key point is that it's a continuous flow of current which is traveling between objects at almost the speed of light.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Solar » Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:38 pm

Hot Spots *might* indicate filamentary interaction on the one hand, whereas "air showers" might indicate radial, or wider spread (CR "breakdown"), activity on the other. The anticorrelation of CR modulation activity has also been associated with Coronal Holes during data coalesced over the last solar cycle. One has to wonder if CR absorption in the Sun presents the Solar version of "air showers" by inducing coronal holes. Nonetheless at Earth, filaments have been 'noticed near' two Hot Spots. One filament near the Hot Spot in the Northern Hemisphere (Ice Cube), and another filament detected near the Hot Spot far too shy to better concentrate itself in the Southern Hemisphere (Auger Observatory). *No direct correlations though*.

In the subsection section titled "Getting Hotter" this Quanta Magazine article barely mentions the two hotspots and the two respective filaments observed.

The potential exist that one day CR activity might be one of the tools of Messenger Astronomy. Despite a variety of naming conventions Astrophysics is trying to correlate the dynamics of larger scale Cosmic activities which might reveal the circuital relationships ("dark matter filaments") between Sun and Milky Way, then Milky Way and other galaxies, then onward towards galaxies and their clusters. Although this relationship is already known to exist progress is slow; yet speedy. That’s not something to miss out on. It could happen in one's lifetime at a moments notice.
"Our laws of force tend to be applied in the Newtonian sense in that for every action there is an equal reaction, and yet, in the real world, where many-body gravitational effects or electrodynamic actions prevail, we do not have every action paired with an equal reaction." — Harold Aspden
User avatar
Solar
 
Posts: 1306
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2008 3:05 am

Re: Cosmic Rays and their implications to solar physics.

Unread postby Michael Mozina » Tue Jan 02, 2018 11:23 pm

Solar wrote:Hot Spots *might* indicate filamentary interaction on the one hand, whereas "air showers" might indicate radial, or wider spread (CR "breakdown"), activity on the other. The anticorrelation of CR modulation activity has also been associated with Coronal Holes during data coalesced over the last solar cycle. One has to wonder if CR absorption in the Sun presents the Solar version of "air showers" by inducing coronal holes. Nonetheless at Earth, filaments have been 'noticed near' two Hot Spots. One filament near the Hot Spot in the Northern Hemisphere (Ice Cube), and another filament detected near the Hot Spot far too shy to better concentrate itself in the Southern Hemisphere (Auger Observatory). *No direct correlations though*.

In the subsection section titled "Getting Hotter" this Quanta Magazine article barely mentions the two hotspots and the two respective filaments observed.

The potential exist that one day CR activity might be one of the tools of Messenger Astronomy. Despite a variety of naming conventions Astrophysics is trying to correlate the dynamics of larger scale Cosmic activities which might reveal the circuital relationships ("dark matter filaments") between Sun and Milky Way, then Milky Way and other galaxies, then onward towards galaxies and their clusters. Although this relationship is already known to exist progress is slow; yet speedy. That’s not something to miss out on. It could happen in one's lifetime at a moments notice.


It does make me wonder about the solar cycle and why it's been tapering off recently. It seems like there are more questions than answers at the moment, which only demonstrates the need to perform real experiments.
Michael Mozina
 
Posts: 1425
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:35 am
Location: Mt. Shasta, CA

Next

Return to Electric Universe

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests