Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

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Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby pavlink » Sun Jun 15, 2014 12:50 am

Introducing Earth's bigger, older brother: planet Kapteyn b
Jun 14, 2014
http://phys.org/news/2014-06-earth-bigg ... lanet.html


As the Sun so the Kapteyn is a double star.
http://files.kostovi.com/Kapteyn.jpg
We live in a double star system.
We need to study double star systems.

Solar System as 4D energy vortex
http://files.kostovi.com/8835e.pdf
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby Metryq » Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:44 am

both of these planets seem to have small masses. This is consistent with a theory of planetary formation


Wow! Something that actually dovetails with mainstream theory? By now I'm so accustomed to seeing headlines that "scientists are baffled" and do not "fully" understand such-and-such. Meanwhile, every rock smaller than a super-Jupiter is called "Earth-like." By that criteria, Mercury, Venus and Mars are "Earth-like" and would make pleasant vacation spots.

And naturally I wonder about this "habitable/Goldilocks zone" idea...
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby Sparky » Sun Jun 15, 2014 6:05 am

"habitable/Goldilocks zone"
:?

What does that mean? :? For all we know, Goldilocks was a cold, prude! ;)
Or a very Hot vixen! :? Which would fit you best? ;)
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby nick c » Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:41 pm

pavlink,
pavlink wrote:As the Sun so the Kapteyn is a double star.
Where in the article does it read that Kapteyn is a double star? All that I got out of it was that Kapteyn is a red dwarf orbited by at least two planets. No mention of a companion star, did I miss something?

Also, where is the Sun's companion? How far away is it? why is it that we cannot see it?


Metryq,
By now I'm so accustomed to seeing headlines that "scientists are baffled" and do not "fully" understand such-and-such.
Well not a headline, but that still applies, check my highlight in the quote below:
"We were surprised to find planets orbiting Kapteyn's star," said lead author Dr. Anglada-Escudé
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby pavlink » Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:37 pm

nick c,
nick c wrote:
pavlink wrote:As the Sun so the Kapteyn is a double star.
Where in the article does it read that Kapteyn is a double star? All that I got out of it was that Kapteyn is a red dwarf orbited by at least two planets. No mention of a companion star, did I miss something?


Please, look at the photo ( DSS colored - ESO Digitized Sky Survey )

The red ( false color ) star on the down left corner is the red dwarf Kapteyn.
The blue ( false color ) star on the up right corner is the partner, an even colder than the red dwarf star.

nick c wrote:Also, where is the Sun's companion? How far away is it? why is it that we cannot see it?

We don't see in infrared unaided.
Here is DSS colored picture of the Sun's companion.
http://files.kostovi.com/DSS_colored.png
The red star on the down left corner is Avrora.
She is positioned, where you would expected her to be, on the summer ( northern hemisphere ) solstice.

More about Avrora here
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=14503
We live in a double star system.
We need to study double star systems.

Solar System as 4D energy vortex
http://files.kostovi.com/8835e.pdf
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby nick c » Mon Jun 16, 2014 7:44 am

Where are those images from? What do they tell us?
A picture of stars close together does not mean that they are part of a double star system. It could be, and in most case is, an optical alignment.

The phys.org article makes mention of the rapid proper motion of Kapteyn...
Kapteyn itself is no slouch: it flies across the sky faster than almost any other nearby star.
...if it has a companion star then that star would be displaying the same proper motion. It would also be obvious that Kapteyn and the other star were in an orbital arrangement. Why does mainstream not mention this companion? where is the evidence that Kapteyn is traveling through space with a companion star? From the article it is apparent that the system consists of Kapteyn and at least two planets, but no companion star.

Granted, most stars are part of multiple star systems, but I am not convinced that the Sun has a companion. It would not surprise me if a new planet or two (in the outer reaches of our solar system) is yet to be discovered. But, a star should be easily detectable. The smallest stars are Brown and Red dwarfs. Keeping in mind that in the Electric Universe model; a Brown dwarf is a gas giant under different electrical conditions.
There comes a point whereby something of a stellar nature has no place to hide in the proximity of the Sun. So if you are saying that there is a Brown dwarf/gas giant planet yet to be discovered lurking in the remote regions of our solar system, well that is certainly a possibility, but we still need to see the evidence.
Any stellar object bigger than that would easily be visible to present instrumentation if not the naked eye.
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Re: Introducing the Sun's relatives: Kapteyns

Unread postby pavlink » Tue Jun 17, 2014 8:10 am

nick c wrote:Where are those images from?

They are digitalized sky surveys obtained through Aladin sky atlas.

nick c wrote:What do they tell us?
A picture of stars close together does not mean that they are part of a double star system. It could be, and in most case is, an optical alignment.

Optical alignment is an option.

Please, look at the consistency in the bigger picture.
Proxima Centauri
http://files.kostovi.com/proxima.bmp
Barnard Star
http://files.kostovi.com/barnard.bmp
Krypton
http://files.kostovi.com/krypton.bmp
Gliese 581
http://files.kostovi.com/Gliese_581.bmp
61Virginis
http://files.kostovi.com/61_Virgins.bmp
Ross 248
http://files.kostovi.com/Ross_248.bmp
Tau Ceti
http://files.kostovi.com/Tau_Ceti.bmp
Gliese 163
http://files.kostovi.com/Gliese_163.bmp
Gliese 370
http://files.kostovi.com/Gliese_370.bmp
Gliese 667
http://files.kostovi.com/Gliese_667.bmp
newlywed
http://files.kostovi.com/newlywed.bmp
metamorphosis
http://files.kostovi.com/cetus_3.bmp
propagation of life
http://files.kostovi.com/cetus_2.bmp
Gliese 65
http://files.kostovi.com/Gliese_65.bmp
Wolf 359
http://files.kostovi.com/Wolf_359.bmp
HR7444
http://files.kostovi.com/HR7444.bmp
HD140283
http://files.kostovi.com/HD140283.bmp
Gliese 1214
http://files.kostovi.com/GJ1214.jpg
Fomalhaut C
http://files.kostovi.com/FomalhautC.jpg


Closest star system, around 1 ly from us, considering the parallax.
Further apart
http://files.kostovi.com/wwt121201_125901cu.bmp
Closer together
http://files.kostovi.com/wwt120014_163626cu.bmp
Star "B" facing us – 95 Leo
http://files.kostovi.com/wwt115540_153853cu.bmp
Star „А“ facing us – 3 Comae Berenices
http://files.kostovi.com/wwt121033_164909cu.bmp


nick c wrote:The phys.org article makes mention of the rapid proper motion of Kapteyn...
Kapteyn itself is no slouch: it flies across the sky faster than almost any other nearby star.
...if it has a companion star then that star would be displaying the same proper motion. It would also be obvious that Kapteyn and the other star were in an orbital arrangement. Why does mainstream not mention this companion? where is the evidence that Kapteyn is traveling through space with a companion star? From the article it is apparent that the system consists of Kapteyn and at least two planets, but no companion star.

That is a very good question: Why does mainstream not mention those companions/doubles ?

nick c wrote:Granted, most stars are part of multiple star systems, but I am not convinced that the Sun has a companion. It would not surprise me if a new planet or two (in the outer reaches of our solar system) is yet to be discovered. But, a star should be easily detectable. The smallest stars are Brown and Red dwarfs. Keeping in mind that in the Electric Universe model; a Brown dwarf is a gas giant under different electrical conditions.
There comes a point whereby something of a stellar nature has no place to hide in the proximity of the Sun. So if you are saying that there is a Brown dwarf/gas giant planet yet to be discovered lurking in the remote regions of our solar system, well that is certainly a possibility, but we still need to see the evidence.
Any stellar object bigger than that would easily be visible to present instrumentation if not the naked eye.

We need to see the evidence.
I would ask you, or anybody else that can help, to provide up to date composite astrophoto images of the area around RA: 06:05:53 Dec: 23:29:30. That will include near infrared data, inclusive of H band ( 1.45-1.7μm ).
We live in a double star system.
We need to study double star systems.

Solar System as 4D energy vortex
http://files.kostovi.com/8835e.pdf
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