Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

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Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Mon Sep 14, 2015 7:21 am

The other day when i was playing my guitar i suddenly started to wonder if sound itself would have electrical properties.
As we all know sound is defined as a wave, like light, and it's speed also seem to follow it's own set of patterns.
For instance : the sound of a bass-string is streched and takes a long time to dissipate in contrast to a high-pitched snare.
Also when i throw a handfull of sand on a bass-speaker and turn it on then the sand will seemingly starts to float above that speaker without falling back. Like some kind of magnetic interaction is taking place.

Can anyone shed some light on this ?
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby GaryN » Mon Sep 14, 2015 8:46 am

This may be of interest to you:
For example, sound is not a vibration of the air. A sound wave, we know today, is an electromagnetic process involving the rapid assembly and disassembly of geometrical configurations of molecules. In modern physics, this kind of self-organizing process is known as a "soliton." Although much more detailed experimental work needs to be done, we know in principle that different frequencies of coherent solitons correspond to distinct geometries on the microscopic or quantum level of organization of the process. This was already indicated by the work of Helmholtz's contemporary, Bernhard Riemann, who refuted most of the acoustic doctrines of Helmholtz in his 1859 paper on acoustical shock waves.

http://www.schillerinstitute.org/fid_91 ... _tune.html
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Mon Sep 14, 2015 10:12 am

Thank you very much for these explanations :)

I wish i had been looking into this earlier in my life. As musician i always thought that the sound comming from my guitar influenced the candle light instead of some breeze.

So does this also imply that the sound of our voices could be used to collect energy at some point or will it be bound by the instrument that creates the sound ?

My head is spinning at this moment so i probably will have to wait for all the info to settle down before i can truly comprehend all this new information.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Pi sees » Mon Sep 14, 2015 11:35 pm

IgorTesla wrote:So does this also imply that the sound of our voices could be used to collect energy at some point or will it be bound by the instrument that creates the sound ?


There are a number of legends from around the world about the use of chanting, trumpets, drums and tuning forks to move massive stones into place in the construction of megalithic monuments. Even the Bible contains a story about the walls of Jericho crumbling as a result of trumpets being played loudly at multiple points around its perimeter.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Thu Sep 17, 2015 7:50 am

The way i think of sound has completely changed by everything i (started) read lately.
Astonishing that sound isn't used by science as one of the spearpoints to find answers.
It's all about light, gravity, black holes etc., but sounds itself is rarely part of any of these subjects.

Could light make a sound and visa versa for example or is sound itself a property of something else ?

I'm so confused lately about all the new insights bombarding my brain ....
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Pi sees » Thu Sep 17, 2015 5:44 pm

IgorTesla wrote:Could light make a sound and visa versa for example or is sound itself a property of something else ?


Sonoluminescence

And from Lasers Turn Light Into Sound:

To convert light into sound, a laser pulse is compressed to ionize a small amount of water (give the water molecules a charge). The ionized water then absorbs the laser energy and heats up. The result is a small explosion of steam that generates a 220 decibel pulse of sound.


What do you mean by "something else"?
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Fri Sep 18, 2015 5:28 am

I was thining : Maybe sound could be just a property of any mass in motion whereas motionless mass is 'slient'.
Just hypothetical ofcourse. (i can't think of a good example to explan myself, sorry)
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby jtb » Wed Sep 23, 2015 1:54 am

IgorTesla wrote:Maybe sound could be just a property of any mass in motion whereas motionless mass is 'slient'.
Agree. All matter has a specific resonance. When something changes the resonance of an object, be it light or hammer hitting a bell, the object emits a change in color, heat, sound, odor, and taste depending on the frequency emitted and the conductor through which it is transmitted.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby IgorTesla » Sat Sep 26, 2015 8:51 am

After watching a very long documentary on quantum physics (i could not even understand 20% of what was discussed there btw) it became much clearer to me.
Resonance is indeed something extraordinary due to it's unique character and it's even being used to develop weapons.
On youtube we can find numerous videos on how sound is being used as a weapon.

I can safely say now that this thread can be closed. The topic itself has been answered by science years ago, but somehow i missed it.

Thanks for all the responses and my apoligies for bringing up an allready answered question.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Goldminer » Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:24 pm

I think this thread is one that should be bumped to the top from time to time. There are tons of knowledge hidden in threads on the form which are glossed over. Just because a thread has been inactive for a while doesn't make it obsolete' or that it should be "closed."
I sense a disturbance in the farce.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby Goldminer » Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:25 pm

I think this thread is one that should be bumped to the top from time to time. There are tons of knowledge hidden in threads on the form which are glossed over. Just because a thread has been inactive for a while doesn't make it obsolete' or that it should be "closed."
I sense a disturbance in the farce.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby MattEU » Sun Oct 18, 2015 5:04 pm

GaryN wrote:This may be of interest to you:
For example, sound is not a vibration of the air. A sound wave, we know today, is an electromagnetic process involving the rapid assembly and disassembly of geometrical configurations of molecules. In modern physics, this kind of self-organizing process is known as a "soliton." Although much more detailed experimental work needs to be done, we know in principle that different frequencies of coherent solitons correspond to distinct geometries on the microscopic or quantum level of organization of the process. This was already indicated by the work of Helmholtz's contemporary, Bernhard Riemann, who refuted most of the acoustic doctrines of Helmholtz in his 1859 paper on acoustical shock waves.

http://www.schillerinstitute.org/fid_91 ... _tune.html


BUMP :)

Slightly off thread but does anyone have any thoughts, understanding or explanations for "The Golden Section" part and especially the "synthetic geometry" in that linked article? Completely new to me and intrigued by the shapes and space idea ...
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby MattEU » Sun Oct 18, 2015 5:12 pm

GaryN wrote:This may be of interest to you:
For example, sound is not a vibration of the air. A sound wave, we know today, is an electromagnetic process involving the rapid assembly and disassembly of geometrical configurations of molecules. In modern physics, this kind of self-organizing process is known as a "soliton." Although much more detailed experimental work needs to be done, we know in principle that different frequencies of coherent solitons correspond to distinct geometries on the microscopic or quantum level of organization of the process. This was already indicated by the work of Helmholtz's contemporary, Bernhard Riemann, who refuted most of the acoustic doctrines of Helmholtz in his 1859 paper on acoustical shock waves.

http://www.schillerinstitute.org/fid_91 ... _tune.html


jtb wrote:
IgorTesla wrote:Maybe sound could be just a property of any mass in motion whereas motionless mass is 'slient'.
Agree. All matter has a specific resonance. When something changes the resonance of an object, be it light or hammer hitting a bell, the object emits a change in color, heat, sound, odor, and taste depending on the frequency emitted and the conductor through which it is transmitted.


if you change the resonance enough of something large can you change its structure, shape, chemical make up, molecules, it?

if the natural resonance of the earth or parts of it changed would it physical change the geology of the planet?

but how would things stay stable without morphing all the time? or do you need some massive event or absolute basic force to change the resonance of something large?
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby jtb » Mon Oct 19, 2015 6:24 am

MattEU wrote:if you change the resonance enough of something large can you change its structure, shape, chemical make up, molecules, it?
I don't know. However, as evidenced by nuclear explosions, we know there is an enormous amount of potential energy stored in a single atom. Our senses detect only a small amount of this released energy, or resonance.
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Re: Do soundwaves have electrical properties ?

Unread postby jtb » Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:32 am

Michael Terringer from S. Africa contends that a certain sound causes moving magnetic fields that produce the electromagnetism that powers the universe.
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