Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light?

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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:16 am

Hi sketch, Fomenko:s charts in the back of Volume 1, comparing various nation timelines and the length of ruler reigns with just different names, convinced me that his work should be seriously considered and examined for credibility.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:47 am

jtb wrote:
Grey Cloud wrote:Could you provide a link for something with 'much more evidence', please? I just had a quick look and one of her pieces of evidence, a la Fomenko, was that in the middle-ages people used to write 'Jesus' in a different way, i.e. 'Iesus'.
The significance of prefacing a number with an i or a j was that the i or j were interpreted by later chronologists as meaning 1,000. A document dated i350 was interpreted as meaning 1350 AD. Per Fomenko, the i or j originally signified the nativity of Christ.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=214QYY6h4Sc&t=162s

The 'I' is a letter in the latin alphabet it has nothing to do with a number when used in a word and its use pre-dates Christianity. In Roman numerals 'M' = 1,000; 'I' = 1. Why would people using latin as their language make a mistake like this? If they did why has no one until Fomenko spotted it? 'Jesus' is a latinised form of 'Jeshua' or 'Joshua' which are transliterated forms of the aramaic/hebrew name.

Ancient documents very rarely have a date on them. The earliest Christian documents are written in Greek or Aramaic not Latin.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aramaic_alphabet
Last edited by Grey Cloud on Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:51 am

sketch1946 wrote:Haha the title of this thread describes it very accurately...

I hardly know where to start, maybe besides ancient books, people could look at history through art, there are many artworks through the centuries, or architecture, or gravestones, or pottery, or coins...

For example there have been historians, real ones, from Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, India and China, Africa, as well as all the countries of Europe.

One bible historian collected 86,000 quotations from the bible from before the fifth century after Christ, written by people all around the Mediterranean that were involved in the history of the early church... including St Cyril who invented the Russian alphabet to teach the pagan Russians etc etc.

There is also a science of paleography, all about the development of writing, alphabets... for all this to have been falsified in the early 20th century is pure fiction, there would have to have been whole populations, armies, myriads of myriads of forgers... to say it most kindly, this idea from Fomenko is not likely.... :-)

Exactly. And we can add things like ship design, the evolution of arms and other military equipment; food and diet, clothing, metallurgy, medicine and on and on.
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby sketch1946 » Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:15 am

G'day jtb :-)
The fact that there are similar lengths of reigns or similar dynasties in different countries is interesting, but it's quite another thing to infer that a story has been copied, especially when events are shuffled around amongst different times and places... I notice these days that there is a trend in movies and cartoons to steal the names from traditional stories and rewrite the story with a different twist... kids get a completely different idea of an old story like say Snow White, or Jack and the Bean Stalk...

When it comes to pivotal stories like the Trojan War, or the epic poems and tragedies of the ancient Greeks, in history people believed these stories were true, or at least had a solid basis in history not fiction... it's trendy these days to consider these stories as just myths, or to deny them legitimacy by using dodgy dating techniques or the pc rewriting of history by people with modern agendas...

I had experience some time ago with a sort of moon-inspired madness, where some chappie decided that all the letters in the bible should be interpreted as numbers, then added up, and all sorts of new meanings cooked up with the numbers... it's an intoxicating addictive fascination to some people. This guy was called Panin... I had a fellow from the ANU university in Canberra that wrote a program to show how these miraculous numbers and coincidences can be created from ANY text... even 'the cat sat on the mat'....

While it's true that gematria and cabbalism and numerology and astrology and dreams and channeling and spiritism are always attractive to romantics, sadly there's not much real science in these 'disciplines', in my old dad's words "Too many variables!"

I love to seek after truth, so I try not to dismiss anything out of hand without having a good look into it, but sometimes you have to decide to make a judgment about the likelihood that something is true...
at which stage in history was it ever any different?
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:49 am

jtb wrote:Hi sketch, Fomenko:s charts in the back of Volume 1, comparing various nation timelines and the length of ruler reigns with just different names, convinced me that his work should be seriously considered and examined for credibility.

Those charts are just drawings they prove nothing.
As far as I can make out, he has the Peloponessian war roughly contemporary with the Fall of Constantinople. There are no mentions of gunpowder weapons in the accounts of the Peloponessian war but there are in the Fall of Constantinople.
The places mentioned in the Peloponessian War are all exactly where you would expect them to be, i.e. around the Aegean area. The places mentioned in the battles for Constantinople are all where you would expect them to be, i.e. surrounding the Propontis and Sea of Marmara.
There are probably hundreds of major actors in Thucydides' account of the Peloponessian War, many of whom are known from other sources. The same can probably be said of the actors in the Fall of Troy. Does Fomenko make any attempt to correlate these two groups of people?

He is wrong about the Hittites and about Alexander in India (and about India in general). Unfortunately the pdfs wont let me copy text and I can't be bothered to type it out otherwise I would give you chapter and verse as to why he is wrong.

Many of the illustrations in the book (vol1) are labelled as 'ancient' but they are obviously mediaeval from their style. There is one photograph there that is said to be Assyrian but is Sumerian as witnessed by the Sumerian cuneiform on the right of the image (and its artistic style).
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Fri Feb 10, 2017 4:56 pm

Grey Cloud wrote:The 'I' is a letter in the latin alphabet it has nothing to do with a number
Fomenko:s point exactly!!!
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Fri Feb 10, 2017 5:27 pm

jtb wrote:
Grey Cloud wrote:The 'I' is a letter in the latin alphabet it has nothing to do with a number
Fomenko:s point exactly!!!

I didn't say that. If you are going to quote someone then do it properly and honestly. I wrote:
The 'I' is a letter in the latin alphabet it has nothing to do with a number when used in a word and its use pre-dates Christianity. In Roman numerals 'M' = 1,000; 'I' = 1.
You are another one who cannot answer questions:
Why would people using latin as their language make a mistake like this? If they did why has no one until Fomenko spotted it? 'Jesus' is a latinised form of 'Jeshua' or 'Joshua' which are transliterated forms of the aramaic/hebrew name.
Care to answer them or address any of the points raised by sketch or myself?
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
Grey Cloud
 
Posts: 2477
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 5:47 am
Location: NW UK

Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:13 pm

sketch1946 wrote:I notice these days that there is a trend in movies and cartoons to steal the names from traditional stories and rewrite the story with a different twist
Again, Fomenko:s point exactly. For example, The Seven Samurai movie setting was originally somewhere in the orient before the advent of guns. The Seven Cowboy movie setting was in America:s southwest during the 1800s with exactly the same plot but with different named characters. Fomenko claims the same plot was placed several different times in history with different named characters.
sketch1946 wrote:some chappie decided that all the letters in the bible should be interpreted as numbers, then added up, and all sorts of new meanings cooked up with the numbers... it's an intoxicating addictive fascination to some people. This guy was called Panin... I had a fellow from the ANU university in Canberra that wrote a program to show how these miraculous numbers and coincidences can be created from ANY text... even 'the cat sat on the mat'....
I am familiar with Ivan Panin:s work. Hebrew and Greek letters are in fact also numbers. He submitted 4,500 pages of research documentation to the Nobel Foundation I believe in 1945. I may still have some information on his work stashed away in my cellar.
sketch1946 wrote:While it's true that gematria and cabbalism and numerology and astrology and dreams and channeling and spiritism are always attractive to romantics, sadly there's not much real science in these 'disciplines', in my old dad's words "Too many variables!"
At this point I have to relate to you one of my many supernatural experiences. A gambling buddy of mine introduced me to numerology. My birth date was 4,6, 1949 = 4 plus 6 plus 1949 = 1959 = 24 = 6. My wife:s birthday also added up to 6, as did my car license plate #, CC, home phone, work phone, nearly everything for 3 years (no luck with the lottery). Things I had no control over. I would get on a plane to Korea and my flight #, seat #, and hotel room # would add up to 6. One day I was thinking to myself how could an idiot like me ever have been promoted to LTC when I noticed my order # and order date both added up to 6. When I decided that God was trying to tell me that he was the general and to stop trying to do his job, the #s stopped. Didn:t happen again until I was processing out of the Army and my billet bldg # and room # both added up to 6. Draw your own conclusions.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Fri Feb 10, 2017 6:42 pm

Grey Cloud wrote:You are another one who cannot answer questions: Why would people using latin as their language make a mistake like this? If they did why has no one until Fomenko spotted it? 'Jesus' is a latinised form of 'Jeshua' or 'Joshua' which are transliterated forms of the aramaic/hebrew name. Care to answer them or address any of the points raised by sketch or myself?
No. It:s a matter of faith. Believe what you like.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby sketch1946 » Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:46 pm

@jtb my sincere advice about numerology and Panin is leave it in the cellar.. like Fomenko, a huge waste of time...

I think everyone has to choose what to believe, for sure, there are innumerable histories in the world, written by people with various agendas, some simply to make money, some because they are mad or deluded, some because they have started with false premises, some to deliberately confuse or destroy some idea, some to promote some sort of personal conviction, what's new?

In India there is a huge literature of writings about various so-called 'Hindu' concepts, many completely contradictory, in our western literature there are opinions of every shade, from scientology, to various thoughts about what modern people think witchcraft or magic or alchemy might have meant, to lies of every imaginable sort, in religion there are innumerable cults, philosophies and twisted perceptions. In atheism there is no respite, atheism has cults too... some innocent, some downright evil...

The program by that chappie at ANU university demonstrates without any doubt that finding numbers in words can produce apparently amazing coincidences... whether they are statistically significant is another matter...

The history of alphabets is huge, the history of numbers is huge, the very volume of stuff produced by Fomenko makes it very tedious to even try to refute, like Greycloud, I'm not sure if I want to spend the time... I don't like to see anyone taken in by Fomenko though...

My current opinion of Fomenko in physics terms is he seems to be promoting something like quantum entanglement, except we could call it historical entanglement :-)

In history all over the world I believe that politicians, historians, priests and scholars, AND scientists everywhere are prone to exaggeration, deceit, obfuscation, and deliberate or peer-induced amnesia, real, unintended or pretended ignorance etc... the dark deeds of the Kings and Queens of the world, the sins and crimes of leaders, prime movers and their followers, the deliberate lengthening of tribal or national histories are all over the world, the world is full of false claims, within and without any group, so we have to do a lot of weeding to sort what is likely to be true from what is most likely to be without value..... so naturally there are thousands and thousands of documents on some subjects, the islamic hadith for example, or the book of Mormon, or the works of the medieval philosophers, or the works of Augustine of Hippo, or the other Church Fathers of Christendom, or modern mathematical philosophers, or modern atheists, or evolutionists, or global warming scaremongers or global warming deniers etc etc... even this Thunderbolts documentation! I haven't read all 78 pages of one thread I made a couple of comments in!

@jft can you give me a page number in Chron 1 of Fomenko with these 'charts' to save me the trouble of scrolling through all that stuff... 600+ pages... I have lots of things to do...
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby sketch1946 » Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:30 pm

Yes, Latin, and manuscripts were preserved in Europe through the age of the barbarian invasions, manuscripts by their tedious production and handmade nature would wear out with use, same as any book does if you think about it, so a new hand-made copy would be made, and the old tattered or rotting manuscript thrown away... to consider we have about 900 copies of the Iliad and about 25000 copies of the New Testament is witness to handcopied methods of the preservation of knowledge, by careful comparison, it's possible to infer or deduce insertions or deletions or scribal errors. The New Testament was translated into Coptic, Bohairic, Old Latin, Aramaic, Arabic, Hebrew, Slavonic, Gothic, Ge'ez (the language of Ethiopia) and many others, so it's possible to do comparative studies and infer the original content to a great deal of accuracy...

So the issue of the letters of the alphabet being used as numbers was definitely a custom of the Greeks, and then the Romans, and through the Romans the widespread use of Roman Numerals throughout the Roman Empire and on into the Western World for two millenia, you could go out to a building somewhere near where you live and most likely find Roman Numerals inscribed on the fascias somewhere... the famous 666 in the book of Revelation is written in the Greek as three letters...

Like I said before, alphabets and the use of letters as numerals is a huge subject.

This is just one hypothesis of the origin of Roman Numerals... nowadays we use so-called Arabic Numerals, the Arabic world calls them Indian numbers.. with the concept of a glyph for zero and placeholders using a base 10 system.
Hypothesis about one possible source for Roman Numerals.jpg
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Sat Feb 11, 2017 5:08 am

sketch1946 wrote:can you give me a page number in Chron 1 of Fomenko with these 'charts'
Charts are located at the back of the book. My copy of Volume 1 has not yet been returned.

There is a kernel that leads to truth in everything. There is something, whether fact or fiction, in the writings of our current chronology, Panin, Fomenko, Newton, Bible, any other author, person, or nature, that we can use to connect the dots and form in our minds the conception of what we believe to be true. What we believe is very important because we make decisions that effect our entire lives based on what we believe to be true at that moment in time. If convinced that Polar Bears are gentle creatures, your entire life may change in an instant when you sneak into its cage to pet it.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby jtb » Sat Feb 11, 2017 5:56 am

sketch1946 wrote:global warming scaremongers or global warming deniers
Around 2005 I had a tour of the super computer that does global temperature monitoring. I caught the tour guide alone and asked what they have found. He said there is no evidence one way or the other. At this point I have decided not to protect my home from rising sea levels. Hope this guy was correct.
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Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:20 am

First of all a correction: In my 10th Feb 3:49pm post, I wrote 'Fall of Troy' when I meant Fall of Constantinople.

sketch,
In the introduction to his book Chron 1... a forward from Alexander Zinoviev describes almost exactly what he is doing... "Fomenko's works describe the technology of building a false model of human history which uses the art of manipulating the temporal and spatial coordinates of events. <...> Their forte is the ability to misrepresent historical events while giving correct temporal and spatial coordinates and representing individual facts veraciously and in full detail. The actual falsification is achieved via the selection of facts, their combination and interpretation...

Which is a pretty good description of someone who presents a global falsification of history.
Well spotted. That is Fomenko's methodology in a nutshell.

Your comments about stories such as Snow White are a false anology. They are stories and were never put forward as history. They are, generally speaking, allegories (usually Hermetic).

jtb,
I wouldn't make too much of the numerology. The number 6 is the number of Earth. It means you are solid.
6+6+6 = 18. 1+8 = 9. The number 9 is the number of Man and relates to his position relative to 1 and 10 which are both numbers of the divine.

No. It;s a matter of faith. Believe what you like.
Another cop out. As I have said before, it is not a matter of faith, it is a matter of weighing evidence and arriving at a reasoned opinion.

sketch,
In India there is a huge literature of writings about various so-called 'Hindu' concepts, many completely contradictory, in our western literature there are opinions of every shade, from scientology, to various thoughts about what modern people think witchcraft or magic or alchemy might have meant,
Would you care to give some examples of 'contradictory' Indian literature?

jtb,
Supercomputers do not monitor global warming. They do not monitor anything - they just crunch the numbers put into them. A supercomputer has the same relationship to your PC that a F1 racing car does to your car. Same thing thing only much faster. You actually listened to a tour-guide?

Believing that polar bears are gentle creatures shows where belief gets you. Anyone with the least bit of knowledge of the creature would know otherwise.
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
Grey Cloud
 
Posts: 2477
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 5:47 am
Location: NW UK

Re: Anatoly Fomenko: False Chonology

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Sat Feb 11, 2017 8:43 am

Last week I was having one of my periodic trawls through my net sources including the following.
Bryn Mawr Classical Review:
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/archive.html

The following reviews are all from the last two years.

This bunch all have either 'new' or 're-' in their titles:
Waller R. Newell, Tyranny: A New Interpretation. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. x, 544. ISBN 9781107610736. $29.99 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2016/2016-09-23.html

Jonathan R. W. Prag, Josephine Crawley Quinn, The Hellenistic West: Rethinking the Ancient Mediterranean. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. xxi, 271; 8 p. of plates. ISBN 9781107032422. $120.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-03-09.html

Christopher A. Beeley (ed.), Re-reading Gregory of Nazianzus: Essays on History, Theology, and Culture. CUA studies in early Christianity. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 2012. Pp. xiii, 319 . ISBN 9780813219912. $39.95.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-04-03.html

Michael C. Hoff, Rhys F. Townsend (ed.), Rough Cilicia: New Historical and Archaeological Approaches. Proceedings of an international conference held at Lincoln, Nebraska, October 2007. Oxford; Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2013. Pp. xii, 315. ISBN 9781842175187. $130.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-05-10.html

Joop A. van Waarden, Gavin Kelly (ed.), New Approaches to Sidonius Apollinaris. Late antique history and religion, 7. Leuven: Peeters, 2013. Pp. xi, 397. ISBN 9789042929289. €89.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-05-42.html

Julia Kindt, Rethinking Greek Religion. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pp. xiii, 235. ISBN 9780521127738. $29.99 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-09-47.html

This next bunch demonstrate the variety of subjects which modern scholars study:

Mary R. Bachvarova, From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Ancient Greek Epic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. xxxviii, 649. ISBN 9780521509794. $160.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2016/2016-11-14.html

James Clackson, Language and Society in the Greek and Roman Worlds. Key themes in ancient history. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 2015. Pp. xiv, 204. ISBN 9780521140669. £19.99​.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2016/2016-04-46.html

Christopher I. Beckwith, Greek Buddha: Pyrrho's Encounter with Early Buddhism in Central Asia. Princeton; Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2015. Pp. xxi, 275. ISBN 9780691166445. $29.95.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2016/2016-02-32.html

Klaus Geus, Martin Thiering (ed.), Features of Common Sense Geography: Implicit Knowledge Structures in Ancient Geographical Texts. Antike Kultur und Geschichte, Bd 16. Berlin; Münster; Wien; Zürich; London​: LIT Verlag, 2014. Pp. 376. ISBN 9783643905284. €59.90.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-01-20.html

Kirk Ormand, The Hesiodic 'Catalogue of Women' and Archaic Greece. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. x, 265. ISBN 9781107035195. $90.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-07-13.html

Lowell Edmunds, Approaches to Greek Myth. Second edition (first edition 1990). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. Pp. viii, 470. ISBN 9781421414195. $29.95 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-06-13.html

Edward Jenner, The Gold Leaves: (Being an Account and Translation from the Ancient Greek of the so-called ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets). Pokeno: Atuanui Press, 2014. Pp. 160. ISBN 9780992245375. $35.00 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-06-18.html

Johan C. Thom (ed.), Cosmic Order and Divine Power: Pseudo-Aristotle, 'On the Cosmos'. SAPERE, 23. Tübingen​: Mohr Siebeck, 2014. Pp. x, 230. ISBN 9783161528095. €49.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-08-34.html

Eric H. Cline, 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed. Turning Points in Ancient History 1. Princeton; Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2014. Pp. xx, 237. ISBN 9780691140896. $29.95.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-08-37.html

Adam J. Goldwyn, Dimitra Kokkini, John Tzetzes, Allegories of the Iliad. Dumbarton Oaks medieval library, 37. Cambridge, MA; London: Harvard University Press, 2015. Pp. xxiv, 577. ISBN 9780674967854. $29.95.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-09-45.html

Michael Griffin (trans.), Olympiodorus: Life of Plato and On Plato First Alcibiades 1–9. Ancient commentators on Aristotle. London; New Delhi; New York; Sydney: Bloomsbury, 2015. Pp. ix, 246. ISBN 9781472588302. $120.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2015/2015-10-30.html

Joel Kalvesmaki, The Theology of Arithmetic: Number Symbolism in Platonism and Early Christianity. Hellenic studies, 59. Washington, DC: Center for Hellenic Studies, Trustees for Harvard University, 2013. Pp. vi, 231. ISBN 9780674073302. $22.95 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-01-21.html

Egbert J. Bakker, The Meaning of Meat and the Structure of the Odyssey. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. xiii, 191. ISBN 9780521111201. $90.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-01-40.html

Andrew Monson, Agriculture and Taxation in Early Ptolemaic Egypt: Demotic Land Surveys and Accounts (P. Agri). Papyrologische Texte und Abhandlungen, 46. Bonn: Dr. Rudolf Habelt Verlag, 2012. Pp. xii, 176; 30 plates. ISBN 9783774938076. €65.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-03-08.html

Voula Tsouna, Philodemus, On Property Management. Writings from the Greco-Roman world, 33. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2012. Pp. xlv, 125. ISBN 9781589836679. $24.95 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-03-13.html

Hyun Jim Kim, The Huns, Rome and the Birth of Europe. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. viii, 338. ISBN 9781107009066. $99.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-03-40.html

Alan C. Bowen, Simplicius on the Planets and their Motions: In Defense of a Heresy. Philosophia antiqua, 133. Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2013. Pp. xviii, 329. ISBN 9789004227088. $175.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-03-62.html

Phillip Sidney Horky, Plato and Pythagoreanism. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. xxi, 305. ISBN 9780199898220. $74.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-05-18.html

Johannes Haubold, Giovanni B. Lanfranchi, Robert Rollinger, John M. Steele (ed.), The World of Berossos: Proceedings of the 4th International Colloquium on “The Ancient Near East between Classical and Ancient Oriental Traditions”, Hatfield College, Durham 7th-9th July 2010. Classica et Orientalia, 5. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2013. Pp. vii, 332. ISBN 9783447067287. €58.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-05-50.html

Anne Sheppard (ed.), Ancient Approaches to Plato’s 'Republic'. BICS supplement, 117. London: Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2013. Pp. 137. ISBN 9781905670420. £24.00 (pb).
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-05-51.html

Edith Hall, Adventures with Iphigenia in Tauris: A Cultural History of Euripides' Black Sea Tragedy. Onassis Series in Hellenic Culture. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. xxxii, 378. ISBN 9780195392890. $65.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-06-37.html

Frank Riess, Narbonne and its Territory in Late Antiquity: From the Visigoths to the Arabs. Farnham; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. Pp. x, 288. ISBN 9781409455349. $134.95.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-06-39.html

Michael W. Champion, Explaining the Cosmos: Creation and Cultural Interaction in Late-Antique Gaza. Oxford studies in late antiquity. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. x, 241. ISBN 9780199337484. $74.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-06-41.html

Thomas F. Tartaron, Maritime Networks in the Mycenaean World. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. xvii, 341. ISBN 9781107002982. $99.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-08-34.html

Troels Myrup Kristensen, Making and Breaking the Gods: Christian Responses to Pagan Sculpture in Late Antiquity. Aarhus Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity 12. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 2013. Pp. 297. ISBN 9788771240894. $56.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-08-61.html

Alhena Gadotti, 'Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld' and the Sumerian Gilgamesh Cycle. Untersuchungen zur Assyriologie und vorderasiatischen Archäologie, Bd 10. Berlin; Boston: De Gruyter, 2014. Pp. xiv, 430. ISBN 9781614517085. $322.00.
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-11-15.html

If you read these you will see that scholars criticise each other's ideas and conclusions. There is no monolithic mainstream consensus on any of the topics addressed in these reviews, let alone 'history' itself.
The titles also demonstrate the type and number of elements which scholars use to build up their picture of ancient history. They are not locked into the 'Scalingerian Chronology' as Fomenko asserts.

Compare the bibliography of Fomenko's books. Where are the primary sources?
If I have the least bit of knowledge
I will follow the great Way alone
and fear nothing but being sidetracked.
The great Way is simple
but people delight in complexity.
Tao Te Ching, 53.
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