Are the planets growing?

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light?

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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby seasmith » Fri Feb 06, 2009 6:18 pm

Allynh wrote:

BTW, I have an odd question. Does anyone know how to copy youtube videos to the desktop.


If you have a pc, download the Mozilla browser [you can have more than one browser working simultaneously], then download its "Download Helper" , and go from there.

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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Fri Feb 06, 2009 7:05 pm

(Thanks to everyone in helping me find a YouTube converter. I got TubeTv for the Mac.)

The lectures I posted were from the NEXUS 2005 conference conference where Thornhill also spoke. It looks like the DVDs are only in PAL format, so I am out of luck.

If the EU group gets serious about looking into Expanding/Growing Earth Thornhill should contact Maxlow, since they are both based in Austalia.

I need to get a copy of the Maxlow e-book. The lecture was the best so far in explaining the concept of the expanding earth. He did what I want to do, make a model that runs the clock back and forward. He even took the Earth back to when it was the size of the Moon. I've got to track down the data he has.

This is fun.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Biggins » Tue Feb 10, 2009 3:39 am

I have been looking into this for some time after watching the following video... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjgidAICoQI
I do not understand why there needs to be additional mass? Surely there is a density difference between a cold and warm interior which could account for this.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby GaryN » Tue Feb 10, 2009 2:54 pm

This explanation, mentioned previously, seems to me to cover all the required mechanics for an expanding earth. I am biased of course, as it fits in with my idea of a cold, charged inner earth.
If this model is correct, then the Yellowstone supervolcano rise is due to charged, resonant cavities lifting the land, and not a magma chamber. When the dielectric breakdown voltage is exceeded, the accumulated charge will head skyward, and the land will drop at near freefall speed, producing the earthquake and shockwave. The rising charge will liquify the rock through resistive heating on the way up, creating the magma flow.

http://www.scientificexploration.org/jo ... tassos.pdf

Biggins (Welcome!) posted:

I do not understand why there needs to be additional mass? Surely there is a density difference between a cold and warm interior which could account for this.


I can imagine catastrophic, mega-amp thunderbolts heating the planet and causing expansion, but wouldn't it then cool slowly over time and contract again? I don't think there is evidence for that.
Fun to speculate though!
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:02 pm

GaryN wrote:This explanation, mentioned previously, seems to me to cover all the required mechanics for an expanding earth. I am biased of course, as it fits in with my idea of a cold, charged inner earth.
If this model is correct, then the Yellowstone supervolcano rise is due to charged, resonant cavities lifting the land, and not a magma chamber. When the dielectric breakdown voltage is exceeded, the accumulated charge will head skyward, and the land will drop at near freefall speed, producing the earthquake and shockwave. The rising charge will liquify the rock through resistive heating on the way up, creating the magma flow.

http://www.scientificexploration.org/jo ... tassos.pdf


OMG! I put that PDF on my to-be-read pile and didn't realize the implications.

I was wondering yesterday how the various supervolcanos fit into the equation of expanding/growing earth. Reading your post was a major shock.

I like that. The past two weeks have been a series of major shocks as people posted great links and insights. I feel like I'm in college again; I have a heck of a lot of homework to catch up on.

Thanks...
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Lloyd » Fri Feb 13, 2009 9:11 pm

* I noticed on this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3rholKox10 that Australia is supposed to have been connected to South America. That's a little over half way through. It shows about 13 different creatures that are said to be unique to those 2 continents. But it only shows pictures and gives no names.
* So I found the author's article here http://www.4threvolt.com/files/McCarthy2005.pdf, but it didn't mention those creatures. It only mentions the following ones, of which #5 comes close, but the creatures mentioned there are not unique to those 2 continents. So where do you find those 13 creatures listed on the net?
1. East Asia and western North America share ... many different types of vertebrates in the Late Cretaceous: ... Tyrannosaurs, hadrosaurs, and ankylosaurs are just a few of the dinosaurs that spread between the regions across the Bering span....
2. ... during the Late Cretaceous many kinds of taxa, particularly dinosaurs, crossed the Western Tethys (or Caribbean)
between North and South America.... This American exchange included hadrosaurs, mammals, lizards, snakes and plants.... Caimans entered South America via the north near the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary.... The late Campanian North American appearance of Alamosaurus, a behemoth most closely related to sauropods from Brazil and Argentina (Lehman & Coulson, 2002), demands the re-entry of sauropods into North America from the south prior to this time....
3. ... one still finds Asian taxa in India and Madagascar in the Late Cretaceous.... The Madagascan titanosaur, Rapetosaurus krausei, appears most closely related to the Mongolian Nemegtosaurus and Quaesitosaurus.... iguanid lizards and boid snakes that reached Madagascar from Asia. ... fossils from the Late Cretaceous intertrappean beds of India have definite Eurasiatic affinities.... These Laurasian-India links include: crocodilians; various forms of the eutherian mammal, Deccanolestes; two families of Laurasian frogs, Discoglossidae and Pelobatidae; freshwater ostracods; and charophyte plants
4. ... Australia and South East Asia display terrestrial biotic associations that continued throughout the Cretaceous and lasted until the mid-Tertiary: ... agamid, varanid, and scincid lizards; elapid snakes; and diplodactyline geckos arrived in Australia from East Asia by the mid-Tertiary or earlier. ... Molecular evidence also indicates the divergence of the purely freshwater Australasian and Asian arowana fishes at 138 ± 18 Ma.... vicariance-derived, helicoid land snails implies the East Asian snail separated from its Australian sister during the Late Cretaceous. ... Australian dinosaurs also appear to be most closely associated with East Asia than with any other region. Examples that support this Asian-Australian dinosaur link include carnosaurs, protoceratopsians, oviraptorosaurs, and ankylosaurs
... The sister of the New Guinea-Australian agamids is Physignathus cocincinus of Indochina and South China. The sister taxon to the entire Varanus clade, Lanthanotus borneensis, resides in Borneo. And Varanus olivaceus, the sister of varanids predominantly from Papua New Guinea and islands east of Wallace’s line, occurs in the Philippines.... Australian and East Asian snails did not separate until the Late Cretaceous.
5. ... relationship between Jurassic–Early Cretaceous primitive mammals Shuotherium from China and Australosphenida
from Madagascar, Australia, and Argentina.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Grey Cloud » Sat Feb 14, 2009 5:06 am

I personally have no problem with the idea of an expanding Earth but McCarthy is relying on mainstream dating and Darwinian evolution in his scenario. I do have problems with both of these.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby keeha » Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:21 pm

I'm convinced Total Science -thanks.

As for Darwin, opposition is falling

Another separated species?
[The team in the Canadian Arctic in 2006 found] [t]he fossil, which belongs to a family of long-extinct Asian turtles with almost perfectly round shells...
"We've known there (was) an interchange of animals between Asia and North America" during the dinosaur age, said Tarduno...
The fossil, which was also named [Aurorachelys gaffneyi] in honour of the distinguished U.S. turtle expert Gene Gaffney, was discovered on an Axel Heiberg fiord formed by "a series of giant volcanic eruptions,"
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Steve Smith » Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:34 pm

There's another streaming media downloader that I found that works well without having to use another browser:

keepvid.com

All you have to do is copy the URL from the video source into the bar on the site and it will create a file you can save to your HDD.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Krackonis » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:12 pm

rennurerof wrote:
nick c wrote:"I don't want to get into any debates on the aether or such..."

"What is a 'swirl of aether particles' made of? Is it matter or not?
It seems that you are just using some fancy jargon in an attempt to slip 'creation ex nihilo' in the back door of EU theory
Again, correct me if I am off base here, I am not a physicist."

"If the Expanding Earth theory can be accomodated with out invoking some exotic mechanism for matter creation, that could be interesting reading. Some have suggested this, can anyone elaborate? If so, I have even more questions "


It could be pointed out to nick c that his statements are completely without merit but then that would require that he read what has been posted and make a slight attempt to understand it. However, he makes it very clear that he has no wish to understand the 'fancy jargon' of Lord Kelvin, Nikola Tesla, Sir Oliver Lodge, etc. because apparently in his opinion nothing they had to say on the subject is worth knowing, and furthermore he doesn't want to hear anymore about it. This attitude seems more suited to Wikipedia than the Thunderbolts forum, but to each his own.

However, for anyone else looking at this thread here's a quote from the original post:

rennureof wrote:"Thus the relationship between mass, gravity, and electrical energy, and why matter creation would occur more often inside gravitationally dense bodies. Far from being a case of creation ex-nihilo, creation actually would then be occurring exactly where the aether particles and energy are the densest."


Let me reiterate: "Far from being a case of creation ex-nihilo..."



Here are a couple from Dennis McCarthy on the subject that are more fact based and not just jigzaw puzzles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3rholKox10&

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om9H0Qv0LSU&

In addition to the obviousness of the argument, there are also some examples to compare to real objects:

http://geology.about.com/od/more_sedrocks/ig/concretionpics/concretiongenesee.htm

As you can see, this concretion also expanded. Likely during the Z Pinch process as extra material was created, or gathered, pushing the 'crust' off it.

Now, of course, the earth is not still in a pinch, but it is still gathering protons and such from the slamming of currents into the planet, given that it has a magnetic field, it seems to lend to it that there is something going on inside the planet that generates it, and that would require input power. So it's not too far of a stretch to consider protons and such can build up and that could be considerable mass, over time.

Anyways. I have that theory, others can disagree, but at least its a start.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Krackonis » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:29 pm

Grey Cloud wrote:I personally have no problem with the idea of an expanding Earth but McCarthy is relying on mainstream dating and Darwinian evolution in his scenario. I do have problems with both of these.



Well we all do, but we can't really get around that at the moment. We have nothing to replace it with.

And Lloyd, that was me who posted that 4th Revolt stuff by Dennis McCarthy on youtube. His works are quite good. At least, convincing and thoughtful.

Oh, and I have NO use for creationism, or it's 'science', except its use at providing contrary data to mainstream science that they attribute to 'whatever', but obviously has EU implications. Examples would include "Optimal Genetic Expression" "Giantism" and incorrectly applied, but definitely interesting quasi-historical references that may refer to astral events.(Planets and their interactions)

So no I don't want to prove anything religious in seriously proposing Expanding Earth. It just makes sense looking at the ocean floors age. It's physically impossible to do anything but expand given the floor age and layout. 200mya (or whatever) there were no Oceans. The evidence is right there on the oceans floor.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Wed Mar 04, 2009 3:50 pm

Krackonis wrote:
In addition to the obviousness of the argument, there are also some examples to compare to real objects:

http://geology.about.com/od/more_sedrocks/ig/concretionpics/concretiongenesee.htm

As you can see, this concretion also expanded. Likely during the Z Pinch process as extra material was created, or gathered, pushing the 'crust' off it.


The concretion you link to is a perfect example of what I've stumbled across the past two weeks.

I mentioned in another thread falling down the rabbit hole and finding everything that discusses "biological transmutation". Essentially, the Universe is a vast machine manipulating matter, transmuting it; shaping it, growing matter everywhere, even as we speak. That things like Low Energy Nuclear Reactions are occurring on a regular basis; biological, non-biological, etc... That's how the Earth grew, the planets, everything.

That's why dating using radioactive sources is not accurate since all the elements are endlessly mutable. It seems even something as simple as water can act like a machine transmuting elements.

Start with the key post in Recovered: Transmutation on Stars, Planets etc and then read the whole thread, and follow all of the links to see what I mean. It will take you a couple of intense weeks, but it will add the foundation to understand how matter comes into existence rather than "from nothing".

When I reached a stopping point, and essentially ran out of steam, I realized that all the SciFi stories of nanotechnology growing things from "seeds" already exists, and it's called the Universe.

I've got to go have a lie down now, my brain is melting. Wait, it's not melting, it's transforming into a Crystal Skull--Noooooo!

I'm having too much fun with all this.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby bboyer » Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:50 pm

Excellent post, allynh. Thank you.
There is something beyond our mind which abides in silence within our mind. It is the supreme mystery beyond thought. Let one's mind and one's subtle body rest upon that and not rest on anything else. — Maitri Upanishad
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Brigit Bara » Mon Mar 09, 2009 10:11 am

Krackonis, interesting geode. It brought to mind that Carey found a "hierarchy of polygons into which the earth's crust is broken." I never got to read the book, though.

http://www.grisda.org/origins/12041.htm


'In response to the question, "What causes the expansion of the earth?" Carey's first response is that he does not know. Suggested possibilities are:

a. phase changes in the earth core (pp. 124, 450).
b. secular decrease in the universal gravitational constant (p. 451).
c. secular change in e/m (charge/mass of electron) (p. 457).'
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby StevenO » Mon Mar 09, 2009 12:29 pm

Here is an explanation I like about why planets grow:

1) The planets' cores consists of white-dwarf debris (white dwarves expand back to regular size over a long period)
2) The earth collects at least 1000 tons of interstellar material/day
3) Water is a wasteproduct of bacteria, so we are lucky that the earth expands otherwise we would all be fishies

http://www.reciprocalsystem.com/isus/rec/rec27/earthcore.html
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