Are the planets growing?

Beyond the boundaries of established science an avalanche of exotic ideas compete for our attention. Experts tell us that these ideas should not be permitted to take up the time of working scientists, and for the most part they are surely correct. But what about the gems in the rubble pile? By what ground-rules might we bring extraordinary new possibilities to light?

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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Aardwolf » Wed Apr 04, 2018 6:14 am

http://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/whats-causing-the-earth-to-split-open-in-kenya/ar-AAvrbaW?li=AAmiR2Z&ocid=ientp#image=1
A giant crack in the Earth opened up almost overnight, 50 feet deep and at its widest 65 feet across, slicing through a highway and terrifying many who live in an area just west of Nairobi, Kenya.
That's odd. I don't remember anyone complaining about 65 feet of land disappearing anywhere overnight to compensate. Funny that.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:17 am

Thanks, Aardwolf.

What I find bizarre about the scientists commenting, is that they claim rain water washed the material away. HA!

Why This Giant Crack Opened Up In Kenya
http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/na ... kenya.aspx
The region has yielded a trove of archaeological finds in the past and may border a new continent 50 million years in the future.

MAI MAHIU-NAROK ROAD, in a region just west of Nairobi, Kenya, used to be fully intact.

Then, after a period of heavy rainfall late last month, a massive crack was exposed. According to the local news outlet, Daily Nation, it measures 15 metres deep and 20 metres wide in some spots.

Geologist David Adede, who spoke with the paper, said the crack was likely filled previously with volcanic ash from nearby Mt. Longonot. This means the space was only exposed when rainwater washed the ash away.

Reuters reports that the opening formed rapidly. One resident named Eliud Njoroge Mbugua saw the crack run through his home. He was only narrowly able to collect some of his belongings before his house collapsed.

So what caused the break in the first place?

Great Rift

The crack, only recently exposed from its hiding place in the Earth, is part of the Great Rift Valley.

The name is often used to refer to a cultural region from the Middle East to Mozambique, but is not actually connected to the same unit. Rather it's made of multiple rifts all running through the same system.

A rift valley refers to a lowland region where tectonic plates rift, or move apart. The large crack that recently exposed itself in Kenya is from the East African Rift. In the 6,000 kilometre-long East African Rift, there are two smaller systems called the Gregory Rift and the Western Rift, and each is speckled with volcanoes.

The rifts are growing larger as two tectonic plates, the Somali plate in the east and the Nubian plate in the west, move away from each other.

The region has yielded some of history's most important archaeological finds and has been nicknamed the “cradle of humanity.” “Turkana boy,” a 1.5-million-year-old hominin skeleton was found there. It's an important piece of evidence for scientists piecing together our prehistoric past.

While it's one of the largest, the East African Rift isn't the only geological formation of its kind. Eastern Russia is home to the Baikal Rift Valley, and Antarctica is separated by the West Antarctic Rift.

In the U.S., the southwest is sliced by the Rio Grande Rift Valley, which stretches from Chihuahua, Mexico to Colorado. It's formation, roughly 30 million years ago, is responsible for the Rio Grande River bordering the southern U.S.

Video Giant Crack In Kenya Giant Crack In Kenyaloading...
A Growing Divide

Eventually, the Somali plate may completely separate from the Nubian plate and form a separate land mass comparable to Madagascar or New Zealand. Fortunately for those who live there, that separation isn't expected to happen for another 50 million years. It does mean, however, that the physical effects of that separation will continue to be felt.

The Daily Nation reported that transportation officials often blame the rift for infrastructure issues, and it's not known how safe a new railway in the region is.

Local outlet NTV reported that in the days since the rift occurred, the crack has been filled in with a mix of concrete and rocks and is being used as a road once again.

Writing in the Conversation, researcher Lucia Perez Diaz from Royal Holloway, University of London noted that the rift will slowly split apart at different rates. The northern region is coated with volcanic rocks, she notes, meaning it may be the first region to break up.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Fri Apr 13, 2018 7:58 pm

This video is deeply disturbing. I'm not sure how much of it is about comets and two mile thick ice, and how much of it is electrical discharge machining(EDM), but the basics of sea level rise and megafauna die off and megalith structures that are 12k years old shake me to the core, because something did happen, and the interpretation is too dependent on the model you use to be comfortable.

I need to watch this a few times, and read his books again.

New Graham Hancock the Evidence Mainstream Archaeology Does Not Want You to See
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZhSun9_SYs

They assume two miles of ice because sea levels rose 400 feet world wide.

What if there was no ice age, no two miles of ice, simply water added from outside, or more likely, new water production as the Earth grew 15% killing off the mega fauna.

I don't know if he is aware of the Electric Universe model. The people in England who are going to do the Conference should invite Hancock to attend as an observer so he can see what's going on.
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby GaryN » Sat Apr 14, 2018 10:15 pm

"..but the basics of sea level rise and megafauna die off and megalith structures that are 12k years old shake me to the core,.."

I've been of the same mind lately, astounded I might say, with my recent awareness of the magnitude and extent of the megalithic structures, or the remains of such, and a great electrical/plasma catastrophic event would seem the only explanation for their highly eroded and/or totally destroyed state.
I am not in agreement with the Ice Age models though, as from what I understand, the proposed depth and extent of the ice was necessary in order to explain the noted surface features and objects such as the glacial erratics, which IMO are more readily explained by the same forces that destroyed the megalithic structures.

".. simply water added from outside, or more likely, new water production.."

New water, for me. The creation of the new water would be an exothermic event, with a resulting temperature of -170C, sufficient to have flash frozen those mammoths. A minimum of -150C is what I have read would be required. An event of this nature also fits with the Salish legends of the Great Snow, as well as the deluge.

I'm not sold on the expanding Earth theory, yet, anyway, but on many points I think we are in agreement. My most recent surprise/shock though is the existence of the land of Aratta, going back perhaps 20,000 years, a civilisation I had never heard of before, though I see seasmith had mentioned in a previous post that I must have missed at the time. A visit to Shu-Nun is definitely on my bucket list.
In order to change an existing paradigm you do not struggle to try and change the problematic model. You create a new model and make the old one obsolete. -Buckminster Fuller
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby allynh » Fri May 04, 2018 7:22 pm

Okay, this is most disturbing, I'm jealous that they have a beautiful app that is completely worthless to me. I'll post the link to the actual website first. Read the article to see the context.

Ancient Earth Globe
http://dinosaurpictures.org/ancient-earth/#540

How can I do the same thing but showing GET in action. I want, I want. Grumble, grumble, grumble.....

How Earth's continents have shifted: Interactive map lets you travel back in time to see our planet over 600 million years of its history
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... story.html
A new interactive map lets you travel back in time to view our planet as it appeared millions of years ago.

'Ancient Earth Globe' reveals how the continents have split and reformed while oceans advanced and receded across 600 million years of the planet's history.

The map was built using research from Northern Arizona University and reveals that humans are 'just a blip in history', according to the former Google engineer behind it.

Ian Webster, who now works for asteroid database Asterank in Mountain View, California, told MailOnline: 'I want people to learn that Earth has a long past that nearly defies imagination.

'The Earth went through so many phases in which it was fundamentally different from the way it is today. Humans are just a blip in history.'

The website gives you views of the planet as it looked from 600 million years ago, when the first multicellular life appeared, through several key points in Earth's history.

It allows you to jump back and forth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the appearance of the first hominids - the primate family that includes humans and our fossil ancestors.

Summaries of each period reveal what was happening at different stages, such as the Late Triassic period 200 million years ago, or the Early Cambrian period 540 million years ago.

Of particular interest is the formation of Pangea around 280 million years ago, when all of Earth's landmass were clustered as a single super continent that was surrounded by one ocean, Panthalassa.

A new interactive map lets you travel back in time to view our planet as it appeared millions of years ago. Pictured is the planet during the Jurassic period
'Ancient Earth Globe' reveals how the continents have split and reformed while oceans advanced and receded across 600 million years of the planet's history. This image shows how the planet looked when the first primates appeared
'Ancient Earth Globe' reveals how the continents have split and reformed while oceans advanced and receded across 600 million years of the planet's history. This image shows how the planet looked during the Jurassic period (left) and when the first primates appeared (right)

The map was built using research from Northern Arizona University and reveals that humans are 'just a blip in history', according to the former Google engineer behind it. Pictured is the Earth as it appeared 430 million years ago
The map was built using research from Northern Arizona University and reveals that humans are 'just a blip in history', according to the former Google engineer behind it. Pictured is the Earth as it appeared 430 million years ago
The website gives you views of the planet as it looked from 600 million years ago, when the first multicellular life appeared (pictured), through several key points in Earth's history
The website gives you views of the planet as it looked from 600 million years ago, when the first multicellular life appeared (pictured), through several key points in Earth's history
The East Coast of the United States would have bordered North Africa while America's Gulf Coast was nestled against Cuba.

Also of interest is the end of the Cretaceous period - the extinction of the dinosaurs - 65 million years ago.

At this time Africa had a huge ocean channelling down its north eastern edge, while Australia and Antarctica were almost touching.

The first hominids emerged in Africa during the Neocene Period around 20 million years ago. The ape-like ancestors would eventually go on to form the human race among a number of other human-like species such as Neanderthals. Pictured is the Earth when hominids first appeared on the planet
The first hominids emerged in Africa during the Neocene Period around 20 million years ago. The ape-like ancestors would eventually go on to form the human race among a number of other human-like species such as Neanderthals. Pictured is the Earth when hominids first appeared on the planet
The first dinosaurs walked the Earth 220 million years ago during the Middle Triassic (pictured)

At this point in time the Earth was recovering from the Permian-Triassic extinction. Therapsids and archosaurs emerged, along with the first flying invertebrates
The first dinosaurs walked the Earth 220 million years ago during the Middle Triassic (pictured). At this point in time the Earth was recovering from the Permian-Triassic extinction. Therapsids and archosaurs emerged, along with the first flying invertebrates

Also of interest is the end of the Cretaceous period - the extinction of the dinosaurs - 65 million years ago (pictured). At this time Africa had a huge ocean channelling down its north eastern edge, while Australia and Antarctica were almost touching
Also of interest is the end of the Cretaceous period - the extinction of the dinosaurs - 65 million years ago (pictured). At this time Africa had a huge ocean channelling down its north eastern edge, while Australia and Antarctica were almost touching
Mr Webster told MailOnline: 'It's also interesting how Europe and the central US used to be under oceans, as that affects modern day geology and palaeontology.'

The software engineer created the interactive map as a handy educational tool for younger generations.

He said: 'I decided to make this map because I think ancient history and geology is fascinating.

'It can be difficult to conceptualise what Earth used to look like. Putting this knowledge in a format we're all used to - an interactive globe - goes a long way toward creating an educational tool for geological history.'

Of particular interest is the formation of Pangea around 280 million years ago (pictured), when all of Earth's landmass formed a single super continent that was surrounded by one ocean, Panthalassa
Of particular interest is the formation of Pangea around 280 million years ago (pictured), when all of Earth's landmass formed a single super continent that was surrounded by one ocean, Panthalassa
WHEN WERE EARTH'S 'BIG FIVE' EXTINCTION EVENTS?

Traditionally, scientists have referred to the 'Big Five' mass extinctions, including perhaps the most famous mass extinction triggered by a meteorite impact that brought about the end of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

But the other major mass extinctions were caused by phenomena originating entirely on Earth, and while they are less well known, we may learn something from exploring them that could shed light on our current environmental crises.

The Late Ordovician: This ancient crisis around 445m years ago saw two major waves of extinction, both caused by climate change associated with the advance and retreat of ice sheets in the southern hemisphere. This makes it the only major extinction to be linked to global cooling.

The Late Devonian: This period is now regarded as a number of 'pulses' of extinction spread over 20m years, beginning 380m years ago. This extinction has been linked to major climate change, possibly caused by an eruption of the volcanic Viluy Traps area in modern-day Siberia. A major eruption might have caused rapid fluctations in sea levels and reduced oxygen levels in the oceans.

The Middle Permian: Scientists have recently discovered another event 262m years ago that rivals the 'Big Five' in size. This event coincided with the Emeishan eruption in what's now China, and is known to have caused simultaneous extinctions in the tropics and higher latitudes.

The Late Permian: The Late Permian mass extinction around 252m years ago dwarfs all the other events, with about 96% of species becoming extinct. The extinction was triggered by a vast eruption of the Siberian Traps, a gigantic and prolonged volcanic event that covered much of modern day Siberia, which led to a cascade of environmental effects.

The Late Triassic: The Late Triassic event, 201m years ago, shares a number of similarities with the Late Permian event. It was caused by another large-scale eruption, this time of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, which heralded the splitting of the supercontinent Pangaea and the initial opening of what would later become the Atlantic Ocean.

Nasa release first global map of Earth at night in five years
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Re: Are the planets growing?

Unread postby Aardwolf » Thu May 10, 2018 4:54 am

allynh wrote:Okay, this is most disturbing, I'm jealous that they have a beautiful app that is completely worthless to me. I'll post the link to the actual website first. Read the article to see the context.

Ancient Earth Globe
http://dinosaurpictures.org/ancient-earth/#540

How can I do the same thing but showing GET in action. I want, I want. Grumble, grumble, grumble.....

How Earth's continents have shifted: Interactive map lets you travel back in time to see our planet over 600 million years of its history
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... story.html
They just look like unnatural randomised garbage. How anyone could favour this mechanism over the clearly natural evolution shown by the Neil Adams video is beyond me.
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